Teaching Atlas of Nuclear Medicine (Google eBook)

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Thieme, Apr 15, 2000 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 512 pages
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Each volume in Thieme's new Teaching Atlas series features a wide range of challenging cases in radiology, and is ideal for both self-assessment and review. All cases stress the "real-life" presentation of a specific clinical problem, beginning with high-quality radiographs and followed by patient history, radiographic findings, differential-diagnosis, discussion, and suggestions for further reading. Highlighted "Pearls," "Pitfalls", and "Controversial Issues" round out the presentation of each case and provide the reader with hundreds of useful hints and recommendations. A must for residents rotating in sub-specialties or studying for board examinations, the Teaching Atlas series is also a useful review for experienced practitioners.

In the TEACHING ATLAS OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE, you'll find comprehensive coverage of the entire field of nuclear medicine through a series of clearly presented cases. Following the board exam format, the cases are presented as unknowns, with an image and brief clinical description; you are then asked to arrive at your own differential diagnosis. Complete with tips, pearls, pitfalls, and a brief discussion of each case, this is the ideal book for self-testing and maximizing your study time.

  

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