The British Essayists;: Spectator (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols and son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and son, W.J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, R. Faulder, ... [and 40 others], 1808 - English essays
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Page 88 - My beloved spake, and said unto me, Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone ; The flowers appear on the earth ; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land ; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 276 - And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer, and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.
Page 188 - fair light, And thou enlighten'd earth, so fresh and gay, Ye hills, and dales, ye rivers, woods, and plains, And ye that live and move, fair creatures, tell, Tell, if ye saw, how came I thus, how here?
Page 57 - O thou that, with surpassing glory crowned, Look'st from thy sole dominion like the god Of this new World at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminished heads to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 Sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams...
Page 219 - So saying, her rash hand in evil hour Forth reaching to the fruit, she plucked, she ate : Earth felt the wound, and nature from her seat, Sighing through all her works, gave signs of woe, That all was lost.
Page 279 - O flowers That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my last At even, which I bred up with tender hand From the first opening bud, and gave ye names, Who now shall rear ye to the sun, or rank Your tribes, and water from the ambrosial fount...
Page 191 - O'er other creatures. Yet when I approach Her loveliness, so absolute she seems And in herself complete, so well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say, Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best. All higher knowledge in her presence falls Degraded : wisdom in discourse with her Loses discountenanced, and like folly shows.
Page 74 - EPITAPH. ON THE COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE. UNDERNEATH this sable hearse Lies the subject of all verse, Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother : Death, ere thou hast slain another, Fair, and learned, and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.
Page 142 - But there is a spirit in man : and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. Great men are not always wise : neither do the aged understand judgment.
Page 61 - And worthy seem'd ; for in their looks divine The image of their glorious Maker shone, Truth, wisdom, sanctitude severe and pure (Severe, but in true filial freedom placed), Whence true authority in men ; though both Not equal, as their sex not equal seem'd ; For contemplation he, and valour, form'd ; For softness she, and sweet attractive grace ; He for God only, she for God in him...

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