A Text-book of botany, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1898 - 632 pages
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Page 46 - A highly organized plant which begins its development with the simplest stages and gradually advances to a higher state of differentiation repeats in its ontogeny itsphylogenetic development " ; and further on, " From the fossil remains of former geological periods it is safe to conclude that such Conifers as Thuja, Biota, and the various Junipers that now have scalelike compressed leaves have been derived from Conifers with needle-shaped leaves. This conclusion is further confirmed by the fact...
Page 217 - BY PLANTS. WHILE IN THE PROCESS OF ASSIMILATION GREEN PLANTS ALONE, AND ONLY IN THE LIGHT, DECOMPOSE CARBONIC ACID AND GIVE OFF OXYGEN, ALL PLANT ORGANS WITHOUT EXCEPTION BOTH BY DAY AND BY NIGHT TAKE UP OXYGEN AND GIVE OFF CARBONIC ACID. Organic substance, obtained by assimilation, is in turn lost by respiration.
Page 51 - ... tubercles, that is to say, small rounded bodies, visible to the naked eye. The bacilli, lodged in these tubercles of which they cause the formation, are parasites, belonging to the lowest scale of vegetable life and must be considered as the specific cause of all tuberculous diseases. This parasite, so small that it can only be seen with the aid of a powerful microscope, not only gradually destroys the lung substance through ulcerative processes, but at the same time gives off certain poisonous...
Page 375 - ... intimate connection, and together forming a compound thallus or CONSORTIUM. Strictly speaking, both Fungi and Algae should be classified in their respective orders; but the Lichens exhibit among themselves such an agreement in their structure and mode of life, and have been so evolved as consortia, that it is more convenient to treat them as a separate class. In the formation of the thallus the algal cells become enveloped by the mycelium of the fungus in a felted tissue of hyphae (Fig.
Page 375 - The Fungus derives its nourishment saprophytically from the organic matter produced by the assimilating Alga, without at the same time behaving as a parasite and injuriously interfering with its vegetative activity.
Page 47 - Eeference is also made to the Australian Acacias, whose early pinnate leaves in many cases become eventually phyllodes, and he concludes with these words : " That it is permissible on such phylogenetic grounds to conclude that the Australian Acacias have lost their leaf-blades in comparatively recent times, and have in their stead developed the much more resistant phyllodes as being better adapted to withstand the Australian climate. The appearance accordingly of the phyllodes at so late a stage...
Page 75 - The different colors of flowers are due to the varying color of the cell-sap, to the different distribution of the cells containing the colored cell-sap, and also to the combinations of dissolved coloring matter with the yellow, orange, and red chromoplasts and the green chloroplasts. There is occasionally found in the cell-sap a yellow coloring matter known as xanthein; it is nearly related to xanthophyll, but soluble in water.
Page 72 - Crystals of Calcium Oxalate. — Few plants are devoid of such crystals. They are formed in the cytoplasm, within vacuoles which afterwards enlarge and sometimes almost fill the whole cell. In such cases the other components of the cell become greatly reduced ; the cell walls at the same time often become corky, and the whole cell becomes merely a repository for the crystal. The crystals may be developed singly in a cell, in which case they are of...
Page 74 - ... sap of a number of deeply colored parts of plants in a crystalline or amorphous form. Blood-colored leaves, such as those of the copper beech, owe their characteristic appearance to the united presence of green chlorophyll and anthocyanin. The different colors of flowers are due to the varying color of the cell sap, to the different distribution of the cells containing the colored cell sap, and also to the combinations of dissolved coloring matter with the yellow, orange, and red chromoplasts...
Page 458 - FRUIT). Such inflorescences are wanting or ill developed among the Gymnosperms, while in the Angiosperms they are often well differentiated, constituting unities of a higher order. The modifications exhibited by the fertile shoots of such an inflorescence are due, partly to a difference in their mode of branching, partly to the reduction or the metamorphosis of their leaves. These changes are the result of an adaption to pollination, in the endeavor to aggregate and at the same time render the flowers...

References from web pages

ebscohost Connection: A Text-Book of Botany.
Education: The article reviews the book "A Text-Book of Botany," by Edward Strasburger, Fritz Noll, Heinrich Schenck and George...
connection.ebscohost.com/ content/ article/ 1043205248.html;jsessionid=06F96E4E05CCE011956085728A125DBF.ehctc1

Biodiversity Heritage Library: Information about 'A text-book of ...
A text-book of botany, by Eduard Strasburger ... Dr. Heinrich Schenck ... Dr. Fritz Noll ... [and] Dr. George Karsten. By: Strasburger, Eduard, 1844-1912. ...
www.biodiversitylibrary.org/ bibliography/ 1250

Scientific Literature: A Text-Book of Botany
Scientific Literature: A Text-Book of Botany. Book Authors: Strasburger, E.; Schimper, afw. Review Author: Bessey, Charles E. Publication: ...
adsabs.harvard.edu/ abs/ 1898Sci.....7..680S

JSTOR: Porter's Translation of the "Bonn" Text-Book of Botany
The English edition,' lately prepared by Dr. hc Porter, Assistant Instructor of Botany at the University of Pennsyl- 1 A Text-book of Botany. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0003-0147(189808)32%3A380%3C604%3APTOT%22T%3E2.0.CO%3B2-5

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