Framley Parsonage (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
1 Review
The fourth work of Trollope's "Chronicles of Barsetshire" series, this novel primarily follows the young curate Mark Robarts, newly arrived in Framley thanks to the living provided for by Lady Lufton. The ambitious if naive Robarts looks to advance his career by mingling with the higher class society around him, which leads to a test of his traditionally Victorian values as a gentleman. While Robarts is being compromised and even being brought to the edge of a social downfall, the love of his sister Lucy is challenged by the disapproving mother of Lord Lufton. Amidst this impressive description of English life in the 1800s, Trollope tells this story with consideration and his characteristically satiric humor, gaining for "Framley Parsonage" the general acknowledgement as his most popular work.
  

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Review: Framley Parsonage: Trollope 1996

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

Loved it! Read full review

Review: Framley Parsonage (Barsetshire Chronicles #4)

User Review  - Spiros - Goodreads

Back in the midst of Barsetshire, after my brief sojourn with Werner Herzog in the fornicating asphyxiation of the Peruvian jungle. It is almost as if I never left: once again, Trollope gives us a ... Read full review

Contents

I
5
II
10
III
16
IV
24
V
30
VI
38
VII
44
VIII
49
XXVI
167
XXVII
175
XXVIII
180
XXIX
185
XXX
196
XXXI
199
XXXII
209
XXXIII
214

IX
59
X
64
XI
71
XII
80
XIII
84
XIV
91
XV
97
XVI
103
XVII
110
XVIII
117
XIX
122
XX
130
XXI
136
XXII
141
XXIII
146
XXIV
153
XXV
161
XXXIV
219
XXXV
225
XXXVI
231
XXXVII
238
XXXVIII
243
XXXIX
250
XL
257
XLI
263
XLII
270
XLIII
276
XLIV
283
XLV
290
XLVI
296
XLVII
303
XLVIII
309
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Anthony Trollope, 1815-1885 Novelist Anthony Trollope was born the fourth son of Thomas Anthony Trollope, a barrister, and Frances Trollope in London, England. At the age of one, he was taken to a house called Julians. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there. In 1835, his father Thomas Anthony died. In 1834, he became a junior clerk in the General Post Office, London. He spent seven years there in poverty until his transfer, in 1841, to Banagher, Ireland as a deputy postal surveyor. He became more financially secure and in 1844, he married Rose Heseltine. Trollope wanted to discover the reasons for Irish discontent. In 1843, he began working on his first novel "The Macdermots of Ballycloran" which was published in 1847. He was sent on many postal missions. He spent a year is Belfast, in 1853, then went to Donnybrook, near Dublin. He also went to Egypt, Scotland and the West Indies to finally settle outside of London, at Waltham Cross, as a surveyor general in the Post Office. At this point, he was writing constantly. Some of the writings during this time were "The Noble Jilt" (written in 1850), a comedy that was set aside; "Barchester Towers" (1857), which chronicled the events and politics in the imaginary city; and "The Last Chronicle of Barset." In 1867, he tried editorship of St. Paul's Magazine but soon gave up because he didn't feel suited for the job. In 1871, he went on a visit to a son in Australia. At sea, he wrote "Lady Anna" on the voyage out and "Australia and New Zealand" on the voyage back. The "Autobiography" was written between October 1875 and April 1876 but was not published until after his death. Suffering from asthma and possible angina pectoris, Trollope moved to Harting Grange. He wrote three more novels during 1881 than, in 1882, went to Ireland to begin research for "The Landleaguers". In November that year, he suffered a paralytic stroke and on December 6, 1882, he died. His wife and two sons survived him.

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