Commentaries on American law, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. Kent, 1848 - Law
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the tenth day of August, AD 1829, in the fifty-fourth year of the Independence of the United States of America, JP Dabney, of the said district, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit...
Page 317 - Of Law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God ; her voice the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and earth do her homage ; the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power.
Page 10 - Your representative owes you, not his industry only but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.
Page 511 - ... be actually made, procured, or provided, or fit, or ready for delivery, or some act may be requisite for the making or completing thereof, or rendering the same fit for delivery...
Page 99 - That one of the parties was physically incapable of entering into the marriage state.
Page 257 - State from bringing with them such persons as are deemed slaves by the laws of any one of the United States...
Page 509 - ... or upon any contract or sale of lands, tenements, or hereditaments, or any interest in or concerning them ; or upon any agreement that is not to be performed within the space of one...
Page 484 - The common law affords to every one reasonable protection against fraud in dealing ; but it does not go to the romantic length of giving indemnity against the consequences of indolence and folly, or a careless indifference to the ordinary and accessible means of information.
Page 224 - Constitution, includes all the jurisdiction, which was possessed and exercised by the Supreme Court of the Colony of New York, at any time, and by the Court of Chancery in England, on the 4th day of July, 1776; with the exceptions, additions, and limitations, created and imposed by the Constitution and laws of the state. Subject to those exceptions and limitations, the Supreme Court of the state has all the powers and authority of each of those courts, and exercises the same in like manner.
Page 126 - Mere austerity of temper, petulance of manners, rudeness of language, a want of civil attention and accommodation, even occasional sallies of passion, if they do not threaten bodily harm, do not amount to legal cruelty...

Bibliographic information