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Books Books 1 - 9 of 9 on But with the advantage of proclaiming the doctrine of terrour, which is naturally....  
" But with the advantage of proclaiming the doctrine of terrour, which is naturally productive of a sublime and impressive style of eloquence,* he could not attain the character of a popular preacher. His voice was so loud, that when speaking... "
The Treat Family: A Genealogy of Trott, Tratt, and Treat for Fifteen ... - Page 168
by John Harvey Treat - 1893 - 637 pages
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Annals of the American Pulpit: Trinitarian Congregational. 1857

William Buell Sprague - Baptists - 1857
...he could not attain the character of a popular preacher. His voico was so loud that, whun speaking, it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the shrieks of hysterical womeu, and the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset; but there...
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Annals of the American Pulpit: Trinitarian Congregational. 1857

William Buell Sprague - Baptists - 1857
...he could not attain the character of a popular preacher. His voice was so loud that, when speaking, it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the shrieks of hysterical women, aud the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset; but there...
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The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 35

New England - 1881
...the infernal regions as nearly to be deprived of his senses." The voice of the preacher was so loud that it " could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the shrieks of hysterical women and the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset." Cotton...
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Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University: In ..., Volume 2

1881
...he could not attain the character of a popular preacher. His voice was so loud, that when speaking, it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the shrieks of hysterical women, and the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset ; but there...
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Early New England People: Some Account of the Ellis,Pemberton,Willard ...

Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb - New England - 1882 - 288 pages
...discharged the office of a faithful Christian pastor. It is said that " Mr. Treat had a voice so loud that it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the sbrieks of hysterical women, and the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset; but there...
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Historic Homes and Places and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs ..., Volume 1

William Richard Cutter - Middlesex County (Mass.) - 1908
...mightily confused. The effect of his delivery may have been due to his very loud voice which "was so loud that it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house where he was preaching, even in the midst of the winds that howl over the plains of Nauset : but there...
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Paine Ancestry. The Family of Robert Treat Paine, Signer of the Declaration ...

Sarah Cushing Paine, Charles Henry Pope - 1912 - 334 pages
...he could not attain the character of a popular preacher. His voice was so loud, that when speaking, it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the shrieks of hysterical women, and the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset ; but there...
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Papers of the American Society of Church History, Volume 6

American Society of Church History - Church history - 1921
...he could not attain the character of :i popular preacher. His voice was so loud that, when speaking, ], although they affected to consider the condition of both the En amidst the shrieks of hysterical women, and the winds that howled over the plains of Nauset; but there...
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Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society ...

Massachusetts - 1846
...he could not attain the character of a popular preacher. His voice was so loud, that when speaking, it could be heard at a great distance from the meeting house, even amidst the shrieks of * " Triumphal ventoso gloria; curru orator, qui pectus angit, irritat, et implet...
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