An Intelligent Person's Guide to Atheism

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Duckworth, 2001 - Philosophy - 150 pages
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Atheism has always been open to the attack that it is a sterile concept and that atheists clearly donít believe in anything. In this remarkable book, Daniel Harbour turns this disadvantage into the spearhead of his defense of atheism and incisive attack on religion, whether Christian, Muslim, Buddhist or Zen. He argues that the battle between the two has wrongly been fought on the narrow issue of the existence of God. In reality, the question is based on what is morally good and bad, i.e. whether a religious belief or an atheist belief puts one in a better position to do good. Using modern examples such as gay marriages and racial hatred, Daniel Harbour casts a light on the ideas atheism stands for.

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Contents

Discovering God
23
The Price of Knowledge?
43
Contra Compromise
61
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Daniel Harbour is a gifted Ph.D. student of Noam Chomsky s at MIT.

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