Beneath the Lion's Gaze: A Novel

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W. W. Norton & Company, Jan 1, 2010 - Fiction - 308 pages
2 Reviews
This memorable, heartbreaking story opens in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 1974, on the eve of a revolution. Yonas kneels in his mother's prayer room, pleading to his god for an end to the violence that has wracked his family and country. His father, Hailu, a prominent doctor, has been ordered to report to jail after helping a victim of state-sanctioned torture to die. And Dawit, Hailu's youngest son, has joined an underground resistance movement—a choice that will lead to more upheaval and bloodshed across a ravaged Ethiopia.

Beneath the Lion's Gaze tells a gripping story of family, of the bonds of love and friendship set in a time and place that has rarely been explored in fiction. It is a story about the lengths human beings will go in pursuit of freedom and the human price of a national revolution. Emotionally gripping, poetic, and indelibly tragic, Beneath The Lion's Gaze is a transcendent and powerful debut.
  

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(reviewed by Irene Yeates for www.AuthorExposure.com)
"Beneath the Lion’s Gaze" reminds us that only those willing to be fearless in their quest for knowledge of our world’s history will recognize
what an indomitable spirit we demonstrate as inhabitants of a global community. With an unwavering hand, Maaza Mengiste pens an extraordinarily gripping debut narrative set during the overwhelming chaos throughout the course of Ethiopia’s transformation from ancient dynastic monarchy to a barbaric military dictatorship.
In 1974, despite Emperor Haile Selassie’s exalted military status and humanitarian reign, the Rastafarian-spirited winds of the “Horn of Africa” quietly whisper that the hour has come to depose their “King of Kings.” Selassie’s renowned leonine strength, weakened by age, has stealthily diminished and inflicted its inevitable miseries upon his mind and body. Flickering triumphant memories become his daily reality as he wanders around his palatial surroundings in Addis Ababa. Incognizant or reluctant to address the current famine’s devastation, he silently ignores the increasing rumble of discontent and unremitting complaints among his subjects.
Meanwhile, rebellious university students take to the streets, clashing with intractable soldiers secretly influenced by the sadistic military leader General Guddu, as other high-ranking officers subtly infiltrate the Emperor’s militia to swiftly depose the reigning monarch. A carefully planned coup d’état as a Marxist/Socialist Derg, which promised positive change, initiates a reign of terror that effectively dominates and decimates a nation through atrocious torture, imprisonment of innocents (Helassie and members of his family, men, women, and children), assassinations, and executions.
Neither palpable acrimony nor unreasonable judgment corrupts Mengiste’s scrupulous research. Her brilliant vessel to craft this unrelenting, often painful, yet effusive tale of her heritage centers on an ordinary family caught between the crossfire as a brutal military junta escalates to a civil war spanning almost two decades.
Grief-stricken, Hailu, the brilliant Addis Ababa doctor and patriarch, stubbornly refuses to keep his promise to peacefully release his beloved wife, Selam, from her inevitable agonizing death. Yonas, his eldest son, mirrors his father’s characteristics, while Dawit, his youngest son, favors his mother’s traits. While Yonas, a university professor, is committed to protecting his wife and daughter within the family’s home, Dawit, a university student, is committed to overthrowing Selassie. However, Dawit recoils in horror when he views the Derg’s atrocities toward the Ethiopian people. Disillusioned, he vehemently unites with the guerrilla forces, is branded a traitorous enemy, and cannot safely return home.
When a tortured, brutalized young woman near death is transported by soldiers personally to Hailu in the hospital, he receives the direct command given by the Derg “Colonel” to not only fully restore her to health, but also to return her to him. Fearful for her future sanity and safety, Hailu mercifully grants her the peaceful, compassionate death his wounded heart failed to offer Selam. Subsequently, he is ordered to report to the newly constructed concrete prison where countless countrymen enter, but never exit.
“…I have no need for bones and cartilage, blood and breath. I can forget…I know now that time sinks to the bottom of the sea and rises again in curves. My reflection is only an illusion, only flesh and water manifest in a drop of moonlight that shudders at what it sees on this dead land I once called home…” (Page 207)
As I attempt to envision myself as an inhabitant of a global community, reading "Beneath the Lion’s Gaze" was a richly rewarding experience. Historical fiction often transports one to a definitive period in a country’s history, and my journey deeply affected me. Maaza Mengiste’s debut is an unforgettable tribute to the enormous strength
 

Review: Beneath the Lion's Gaze

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

Mengiste has written a polite novel that does nothing to distinguish it from other books about wars. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

III
5
IV
9
V
13
VI
20
VII
25
VIII
30
IX
33
X
36
XXXIX
161
XL
165
XLI
169
XLII
176
XLIII
180
XLIV
184
XLV
185
XLVI
191

XI
41
XII
44
XIII
50
XIV
53
XV
56
XVI
61
XVII
65
XVIII
72
XIX
74
XX
77
XXI
81
XXII
86
XXIII
90
XXIV
93
XXV
98
XXVI
103
XXVII
107
XXVIII
111
XXIX
113
XXX
115
XXXI
123
XXXII
128
XXXIII
133
XXXIV
138
XXXV
144
XXXVI
151
XXXVII
156
XXXVIII
157
XLVII
193
XLVIII
197
XLIX
203
L
208
LI
214
LII
219
LIII
225
LIV
227
LV
233
LVI
239
LVII
246
LVIII
249
LIX
254
LX
256
LXI
257
LXII
259
LXIII
263
LXIV
269
LXV
274
LXVI
275
LXVII
278
LXVIII
281
LXIX
286
LXX
290
LXXI
292
LXXII
296
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About the author (2010)

Maaza Mengiste was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A Pushcart Prize nominee, she was named "New Literary Idol" by New York magazine. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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