Aeschylus in English Verse, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1908 - Greek drama (Tragedy)
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Page 26 - HERALD. Yea, all is well. Yet, in that weary time, Albeit I could tell of much fair speed, Some hardships vexed us: — who, except the Gods, Lives sorrowless in all things evermore? Of travail might I tell, bleak bivouac, Of iron-bound coasts, hard lying, groans on groans — Who knows how many? — through the straitened days. Then came new ills on land to vex us more : Hard by our foes' walls through the nights we lay; And dews from heaven, and reek of marshy mead Down drizzled, clammy-cleaving,...
Page 27 - ... Ida made intolerable, Of heats, when on his midnoon couch the sea Unrippled sank and slept, and no breath stirred! What boots to grieve o'er these? Our toils are past — Ay, from our dead hath utterly past away All care, though it were but to rise again! Why of those wasted lives take nice account? Why need the living grieve for adverse fate? I to disaster bid a long farewell. For us, the remnant of the Argive host, The gain outweighs, the suffering strikes the beam; So that we well may boast...
Page 23 - Zeus' levin Flasheth its glow. Let mine unenvied weal Nor crush with armed heel Cities, nor conquest feel, Nor thraldom know. Tidings on flaming wings of triumph flew, And swift through Argos goes The rumour of it: yet if all be true, Or if 'tis some heaven-sent delusion — who, Ah me, who knows? Who is so babe-like, who in wit so maimed, That all his heart should glow At beacon-fires that forth their message flamed, Then, when the tale is changed, downcast and shamed, Should be brought low? How...
Page 22 - A people's execration Speaks stern and low, As when an outraged nation Curses her foe. Ah me! mine heart is fain For what comes in night's train! Slayers of many slain Unrighteous gain but tendeth To overthrow. The dark Erinnys endeth All at one blow: Then is the proud down thrust To darkness and to dust, There where the strengthless must All hope forego. Fame above measure given Brings man but woe: Full in his eyes Zeus
Page 22 - ... grief the people of the outraged nation execrate their rulers for the woe they have brought upon them. The war-god who exchangeth Men's lives for gold, And where the mad spear rangeth The scales doth hold, Sends back to hearts that yearn For a brave man's return, Filling one small sad urn Pyre ashes cold. With sighs love tells their story: — In battle bold Was one : one fell with glory With garments rolled In blood : — and each man died All for another's bride ! In whispered pain and pride...
Page 33 - Even so on Ilium-town Floated a spirit down Of peace, by seeming, Of windless peace, a crown Over her wealth-renown Soft splendour beaming; An arrow of desire That archer-eyes were winging; A flower soul-thrilling, springing Out of love's bed of fire. Yet from all this she turned: a bitter ending For all that promised bridal bliss she wrought, That fatal sojourner and guest descending On Priam's line, a Fury ruin-fraught From Guest-ward Zeus, tears to their house she brought. (Ant. 3> A saying of...
Page 34 - In smoke-fouled huts doth Justice shine; On virtuous lives she still hath smiled: From gold-tricked halls and hands defiled, She turns her with averted eyne. A guest she is of each pure soul: She on the power of wealth looks down, With all its base coin of renown: She guideth all things to their goal.
Page 167 - ... destroyedst, and with wine Didst thou beguile the Ancient Goddesses. APOLLO. Soon shalt thou, by the judgment's issue foiled, Spue forth thy venom, yet harm not thy foes. CHORUS. Since thou, the young, o'erridest me the old, Only to hear the sentence given I wait, Yet doubtful whether to be wroth with Athens. ATHENA. With me it rests to give my sentence last. I to Orestes' cause shall add this vote: For mother is there none that gave me birth: I am wholly — save for marriage — with the male...
Page 44 - ... loss cometh dearth; For by gifts of Zeus's hand, And by boons of the furrows of earth From their doors may famine be banned. (Ant. 2) But when once at thy feet on the ground Is spilt the blood of the slain, What spell-chant then shall be found That shall gather it up again? Else, wherefore did Zeus's stroke still In stern foreknowledge the breath Of the Master of Healing, whose skill Could raise up mortals from death? Yet— did not a Fate, from of old Established supreme, restrain Even Gods,...
Page 42 - ... winter-tide; And when in bitter clusters Zeus matures Wine, then is quickening coolness in the house, If but the presence of its lord be there. (AGAMEMNON enters palace.} Zeus! Zeus Accomplished fulfil my prayers! Take thought for that thou meanest to fulfil! (Enters palace.) (Str. i) CHORUS. Why and O why doth this terror insistently haunting me still Like a bird of black doom hover nigh to the heart that is boding ill? And a prophecy rings through the song that sings without bidding or guerdon...

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