Hallucinations: Or, the Ill-Fated Peregrinations of Fray Servando

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Penguin Books, 2002 - Fiction - 250 pages
2 Reviews
In the brilliant tradition of Don Quixote and Candide, Hallucinations is a modern masterpiece of Latin American fiction. Fray Servando-priest, blasphemer, dueler of monsters, irresistible lover, misunderstood prophet, prisoner, and consummate escape artist-wanders among the vice-ridden populations of eighteenth-century Europe and the Americas, fleeing dungeons, a marriage-minded female, a slaveship captain, and the Inquisition. Whether by burro, by boat, or by the back of a whale, Fray Servando's journey is at once funny and romantic, melancholy and profound-a tale rooted in history, yet outrageously hallucinatory.

"An impenitent amalgam of truth and invention, historical fact and outrageous make-believe. . . . A philosophical black comedy." (The New York Times)

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Review: Hallucinations: or, The Ill-Fated Peregrinations of Fray Servando

User Review  - Robin - Goodreads

suggestion from @AlejoEC - sounds interesting... Read full review

Review: Hallucinations: or, The Ill-Fated Peregrinations of Fray Servando

User Review  - Joe - Goodreads

This book was crazy. I embarked upon this read because an important lady in my life happened to have written her senior thesis on it and Alejo Carpentier's Explosion in a Cathedral. The book follows ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
3
Which treats of your childhood in Monterrey and certain
6
CHAPTER
12
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Reinaldo Arenas was born in Cuba in 1943. In 1980, he was one of 120,000 Cubans who arrived in the United States on the Mariel boatlift. Arenas settled in New York where he lived until his death from AIDS ten years later.
Andrew Hurley is a translator of numerous works of literature, criticism, history, and memoir. He is professor emeritus at the University of Puerto Rico.

Thomas Colchie is an acclaimed translator, editor, and literary agent for international authors. He is the editor of A Hammock Beneath the Mangoes. He has written for the Village Voice and The Washington Post. His translations include Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman and (with Elizabeth Bishop, Gregory Rabassa, and Mark Strand) Carlos Drummond de Andrade's Travelling in the Family.

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