Don't Know Much About History (Google eBook)

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Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - History - 752 pages
7 Reviews

Who really discovered America? What was "the shot heard 'round the world"? Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: Did he or didn't he?

From the arrival of Columbus through the bizarre election of 2000 and beyond, Davis carries readers on a rollicking ride through more than 500 years of American history. In this updated edition of the classic anti-textbook, he debunks, recounts, and serves up the real story behind the myths and fallacies of American history.

  

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It's hard to describe how bad this book is. It is the author's personal rant against America. He picks and chooses "facts" and flat out makes up others. He ascribes intent and motive to events long past, always with the same slant - greedy evil white men. When he does cite "facts" they are frequently quotes from other authors like himself. It gets worse as the book progresses. Every other sentence is opinion, and always the same opinion. Only someone like minded could read this stinking pile of #@$$ with a straight face. At times you have to laugh at the absurdity of it, or throw the book against the wall. You may not have known much about history before starting this book, but you will know even less when you are done. Then again, you can just do what the author did, make up your own history with your own slant. 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Read in early 2000 or so. Not very entertaining

Contents

CHAPTER
3
CHAPTER 4
47
To Civil War and Reconstruction
183
CHAPTER 5
397
From Camelot to Hollywood on the Potomac
437
From the Evil Empire to the Axis of Evil
533
AFTERWORD
589
APPENDIX 1
595
APPENDIX 2
616
APPENDIX 3
624
Selected Readings
631
Acknowledgments
657
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Kenneth C. Davis is the New York Times bestselling author of A Nation Rising; America's Hidden History; and Don't Know Much About® History, which spent thirty-five consecutive weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, sold more than 1.6 million copies, and gave rise to his phenomenal Don't Know Much About® series for adults and children. A resident of New York City and Dorset, Vermont, Davis frequently appears on national television and radio and has been a commentator on NPR's All Things Considered. He blogs regularly at www.dontknowmuch.com.

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