Somerset Homecoming: Recovering a Lost Heritage

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Mar 1, 2000 - Social Science - 166 pages
4 Reviews
In 1860, Somerset Place was one of the most successful plantations in North Carolina--and its owner one of the largest slaveholders in the state. More than 300 slaves worked the plantation's fields at the height of its prosperity; but nearly 125 years lat
  

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Review: Somerset Homecoming

User Review  - Tom Tallmadge - Goodreads

As a lover of history, I really enjoyed this novel.Most of us have some interest in our families roots, but few have the stamina to search so industriously,as the author. Kudos to her, for a great book. Read full review

Review: Somerset Homecoming: Recovering a Lost Heritage

User Review  - Larry Lamar Yates - Goodreads

Ms. Redford made the connection to her roots in a North Carolina plantation where one can still see the canals her ancestors dug and the houses they built in the early days of slavery. I have visited ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Beginnings
1
Over de River
23
The Road home
45
The Arrival
61
Voices From The Past
83
Connecting
115
Somerset Homecoming
137
Epilogue
161
Sources
165
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Dorothy Spruill Redford is now executive director of North Carolina's Somerset Place State Historic Site in Creswell, the antebellum plantation on which four generations of her enslaved ancestors lived.

Michael D'Orso's work includes fifteen books, seven of which have been bestsellers and three of which have been Pulitzer Prize nominees.

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