The Travels and Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen (Google eBook)

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American Book Exchange, 1879 - 283 pages
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Page 31 - ... rammed the head farther into the throat of the crocodile, and destroyed him by suffocation, for he could neither gorge nor eject it. Soon after I had thus gained a complete victory over my two powerful adversaries, my companion arrived in search of me ; for finding I did not follow him into the wood, he returned, apprehending I had lost my way, or met with some accident After mutual congratulations, we measured the crocodile, which was just forty feet in length. As soon as we had related this...
Page 186 - Lusiad, was discovered sitting squat in an excavation formed. for him in the centre of the mountain. He seemed just like a young bee in his little cell before he comes forth, or like a bean in a bean-pod ; and when the upper part of the mountain was split across and knocked off, the superior half of his person was discovered. He appeared of a bottle-blue...
Page 29 - I found a large crocodile with his mouth extended almost ready to receive me. On my right hand was the piece of water before mentioned, and on my left a deep precipice, said to have, as I have since learned, a receptacle at the bottom for venomous creatures ; in short, I gave myself up as lost, for the lion was now upon his hind legs, just in the act of seizing me ; I fell involuntarily to the ground with fear, and, as it afterwards appeared, he sprang over me. I lay some time in a situation which...
Page 33 - SET off from Rome on a journey to Russia, in the midst of winter, from a just notion that frost and snow must of course mend the roads, which every traveller had described as uncommonly bad through the northern parts of Germany, Poland, Courland and Livonia. I went on horseback, as the most convenient manner of travelling; I was but lightly clothed, and of this I felt the inconvenience the more I advanced northeast.
Page 34 - What 3 (33) must not a poor old man have suffered in that severe weather and climate, whom I saw on a bleak common in Poland, lying on the road, helpless, shivering and hardly having wherewithal to cover his nakedness ? I pitied the poor soul : though I felt the severity of the air myself, I threw my mantle over him, and immediately I heard a voice from the heavens, blessing me for that piece of charity, saying, " You will be rewarded, my son, for this in time.
Page 168 - I will condemn him to swallow this decanter, glass and all perhaps, and filled with kerren-wasser [a kind of ardent. spirit distilled from cherries, and much used in some parts of Germany]. Therefore, my dear friends and companions, have confidence in what I say, and pay honour to the tales of Munchausen. A traveller has a right to relate and embellish his adventures as he pleases, and it is very unpolite to refuse that deference and applause they deserve.
Page 236 - He spake, and sudden good Lord Whittington, at head of all his raree-show, came forth, armor antique of chivalry, and helmets old, and troops, all streamers, flags and banners glittering gay, red, gold, and purple ; and in every hand a square of gingerbread, all gilded nice, was brandished awful. At a word, ten thousand thousand Naples biscuits, crackers, buns, and flannel-cakes, and hats of gingerbread encountered...
Page 112 - Done ! and done ! were scarcely said on both sides, when some sailors who were fishing in the long-boat, which was made fast to the stern of the ship, harpooned an exceeding large shark, which they brought on board and began to cut up for the purpose of barrelling the oil, when, behold, they found no less than six brace of live partridges in this animal's stomach ! They had been so long in that situation, that one of the hens was sitting upon four eggs, and a fifth was hatching when the shark was...
Page 267 - ... the western coast, and that on the uniting of the two seas there would be a strong current from the east, and it happened just as I expected. The sea came in with tremendous magnificence, and enlarged the bounds of the canal, so as to make a passage of some miles broad from ocean to ocean, and make an island of South America. Several sail of trading vessels and men-of-war sailed through this new channel to the South Seas, China, &c., and saluted me with all their cannon as they passed.
Page 35 - It is not easy to conceive my astonishment, to find myself in the midst of a village, lying in a churchyard; nor was my horse to be seen, but I heard him soon after neigh somewhere above me. On looking upwards I beheld him hanging by his bridle to the weathercock of the steeple. Matters were now very plain to me. The village had been covered with snow overnight; a sudden change of weather had taken place; I had sunk down to the churchyard...

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