American Science Fiction and the Cold War: Literature and Film

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Taylor & Francis, 1999 - History - 216 pages
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A lively and provocative account of the arts in Britain, Building Jerusalem suggests that even after fifty years of state planning of Britain's "leisure industries" the country is nevertheless approaching the millennium in a state of cultural confusion. Drawing on a wealth of historical material from Scotland, Wales, and English provincial towns, as well as the more familiar London story, Pick and Anderton contend that the original meaning of cultural language has been distorted by the fashionable phrase-making of modern government agencies, and by the inaccurate and misleading view of cultural history that is constantly presented to the public.

The authors unfold fascinating stories of Britain's cultural past, before state support of the arts. They vividly relate the great changes wrought by the industrial revolution and by the development of the twentieth century media and describe the long history of Church and Royal support for the arts, as well as the long periods when all of the arts

  

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Contents

Philip Wylie and Leo Szilard
14
History and Apocalypse in Poul Anderson
40
Views from the Hearth
53
Cultures of Surveillance
68
TakeOver Bids Frederik Pohl and Cyril Kornbluth
82
The Russians Have Come
94
Bernard Wolfes Limbo
107
The Cold War Computerised
119
Dr Strangelove in Context
145
Walter M Miller and Russell Hoban
157
In the Aftermath
168
The Star Wars Debate
181
Bibliography
194
Index
212
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About the author (1999)

Professor David Seed is a Lecturer at the School of English, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.

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