The Ultimate Live Sound Operator's Handbook

Front Cover
Hal Leonard Corporation, 2007 - Technology & Engineering - 384 pages
3 Reviews
The Ultimate Sound Operator's Handbook is written to specifically address the concerns and needs of sound operators of all types. High-quality audio is imperative, whether you're running sound for a rock, country, punk, or jazz band performing in clubs, arenas, or outdoor parks. With the advent and implementation of large-budget multimedia presentations, high-resolution multichannel audio for movies, television, and downloads, any live act must sound great to be well received by today's increasingly savvy audience members. This comprehensive handbook focuses on each aspect of live sound in a way that is straightforward and easy to understand, breaking the process down into principles and practices that assist the modern sound tech in everything from planning and budgeting to mixing and recording the live show.
  

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I'm a sound operator, alot of what i read is this book some i already knew but couldn't explain properly nor did i know the correct terms to be used... i have been greatly empowered.. Awesome book!! My live shows and my attitude towards my musicians and audience has changed for the better and i'm loving it... 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Outstanding book. A must read for anyone who works in audio.

Selected pages

Contents

Qualifications of a Sound Operator
1
Listens to Music
2
Is a Proven Advocate of the Act
3
Has a Positive Outlook
4
Is a Hard Worker
5
Pursues Excellence
6
Likes to Help Others Succeed
7
The Duties of a Sound Operator
9
Effects
197
Equalizers
198
Music Playback Devices
199
Recording Devices
200
Intermittent Connections
201
Are They More Trouble Than Theyre Worth?
202
What Goes into a Patch Bay
204
Keeping It Neat
206

Advance Planning
10
Union versus NonUnion Venues
11
Ensure Adequate Transportation
12
Label the Cargo Area
13
Consider Balance and Distribution
14
Determine Power Requirements and Accessibility
15
Connect AC Distribution
16
Determine the Location for Cases
17
Size Matters
18
Find Out What the Musical Director Expects
19
Listen to Board Recordings
20
Learn the Songs
21
Set Up Gear
22
Snakes
23
Mic Cases and Racks
24
Storage Hooks and Racks
25
Learn What a Good Mix Is
26
Volume Issues
27
Why Volume Issues Are So Common
28
EQ versus Volume
29
Sound Reinforcement versus Music Presentation
30
Understanding Hearing Differences
31
Tinnitus
32
Hyperacids
33
Sound Theory
35
Speed
38
Pitch
39
Wavelength
40
Amplitude
41
Phase
44
Harmonics Overtones and Partials
45
Shape
47
Envelope
49
Decay
50
Interconnect Basics
51
Microphone Cables
52
Balance of Amplitude
53
DigitalInterconnect Cables
54
Impedance
55
Terminology
56
Balanced versus Unbalanced
58
Balanced Wiring
59
Connectors
61
QuarterInch Phone Connectors
62
XLR Connectors
63
Speakon Connectors
64
Plugging In
65
Grounding
66
Connect All Equipment to the Same Outlet
67
Disconnect the Shield at the Destination
68
The FrontofHouse Mixer
69
Input Levels
70
Comparison of Three Different Versions of the Same Mix
71
The Preamp
72
Attenuator
73
Direct Box
74
Passive versus Active DIs
75
Peak Program Meters PPM
76
Adjusting Levels for Transients
77
Input Level Comparison
79
Phantom Power
80
+4 dBm versus 1OdBV
81
Channel Insert
82
The Difference between a Live Mixer and a Recording Mixer
83
Outputs
84
Portability
85
Using the Aux Bus
86
Group Assignment
87
Summing
88
Gain Structure
89
Solo
90
Mutes
91
Stereo Master
100
Test Tones
101
Console Layout
102
Matrix
103
The Analog Mixer versus the Digital Mixer
104
Signal Processors
107
To Compress or Not to CompressThat Is the Question
109
The Difference between a Compressor and a Limiter
112
PeakRMS Detection
113
Meters on the CompressorLimiter
114
The Limiter
115
GateExpanders
116
Effects Processors
117
Simple Delay Effects
118
Reverberation Effects
123
Hall Reverb
124
Room Reverb
125
Microphone Principles and Design
127
Directional Characteristic
128
OnAxis
129
Omnidirectional
130
Bidirectional
131
Practical Applications
133
Operating Principle
134
Operating Principle of the MovingCoil Mic
135
Operating Principle of the Condenser Mic
136
Electret Condenser Microphones
138
Comparison between MovingCoil Ribbon and Condenser Microphones
139
Condenser Microphones
140
Ribbon Mics
141
Physical Housing Design
142
The Proximity Effect
144
Response Characteristic
145
Output Characteristic
146
Sensitivity
147
Impedance
148
Wireless Systems
153
Receiver
154
Frequency Modulation
155
Capture Effect
156
Antenna Distribution Systems
157
Diversity Indicator
158
Microphones for Wireless Systems
160
Headset
162
Handheld
163
Mute Switch versus Power Switch
164
Adjusting Levels
165
The Backup Plan
166
Loudspeakers
169
Manufacturers
171
Pro Audio Suppliers
172
Active Crossover
173
FullRange Cabinets
174
FourWay Systems
175
Speaker Components
176
Direct Radiating Cone Speakers
177
The Importance of Enclosures
178
Bass Reflex
179
Component Alignment
180
Speaker Impedance
181
The Racks
183
Dynamics
184
Equalizers
185
Crossovers
187
Delays
188
Peak Power
189
IMD Intermodulation Distortion
190
Power SPL and Sensitivity
191
Effects Rack
193
Dynamics
194
CompressorLimiter
195
ExpanderGates
196
Locking Various Components
207
Basic Equipment Needs
209
Microphones
210
Cases
211
Sound System Recommendation 2
212
Between 76 and 300 People
213
Speakers
215
Mixer
216
Speakers
217
Mixer
218
Evaluate Your Existing System
219
Planning for Growth
220
Growing the Plan
221
Monitor Systems
223
Directional Characteristic
224
Monitor Connections
225
The Feedback Eliminator
226
Singers Can Help
227
More Mics Cause More Feedback Problems
228
The Angle of Ascent
229
To Wedge or Not to Wedge
230
SmallFormat Monitors
231
Headphones
232
ButtKicker
233
Interface with FOH
235
System Hub Splits
236
Splitter Snake
237
Monitor Mixer
238
Getting Wireless
239
System Design and Layout
241
Stereo
242
Speaker Placement
243
Critical Distance
244
Connecting Multiple Speakers
245
Center Cluster
246
SplitPoint Source Arrays
247
Zone Coverage
248
Keep It Neat and Simple
249
FineTuning the System
250
Analysis Methods and Devices
251
The Inadequacy of the RTA
255
Documentation
256
Computer Documentation Files
257
Acoustic Considerations
259
The Room
260
ModeStanding WaveResonance
261
Calculating the Frequency of Standing Waves in a Room
262
Axial Standing Waves
263
Calculating Problematic Modes
264
Red Flags
265
The Rectangle
266
Adjusting Angles
267
Power Alley
271
Using Your Knowledge of Acoustics
272
Miking the Group
273
Guitar Fundamentals
274
Tone Controls
275
Running Direct into the Mixer
276
Electric Guitar Levels
278
Equalizing the Guitar
280
Delay
281
Electronic Doubling
282
Bass Guitar
283
Direct BoxDirect In Dl
284
Levels for Bass
286
Equalization of the Bass Guitar
288
Panning the Bass
289
Drum Conditioning
290
Hardware
291
Room Acoustics
292
Drum Levels
293
Isolating the Acoustic Drum Kit
294
Miking a Kit with Two Mics
295
Miking a Kit with Three Mics
296
Miking a Kit with Four Mics
297
Kick Drum
298
Snare Drum
300
Miking Toms
302
The HiHat Mic
303
Aiming the Mies
304
Effects on Drums
305
Mic Choice and Technique
307
Stereo or Mono
308
Instrument Maintenance
309
Piano Levels
311
Compressing the Piano
312
Reverberation
313
Mic Technique
315
The Bold
316
The Seasoned Singer
317
Hygiene
318
Dynamic Range
319
Backing Vocals
320
Ratio of Mics to Singers
321
Cardioid Polar Pattern
322
Controlling the Band
323
Monitor Position
324
Acoustic Guitar
325
Picks
326
Mic Techniques
327
Dynamic Processing and the Acoustic Guitar
328
Sound Check
331
Labeling and Storage
332
Build a System and Stick to It
333
Zero the Board
334
Mark the Board
335
Verify Functionality of All Equipment
336
Performer Sound Check
337
FineTune the Monitor Mix
338
Communication with the Performers
339
Basic Troubleshooting
340
Creating an Excellent Mix
343
How to Structure an Effective Band Arrangement
344
Ideally
345
Creating Size in a Small Room
346
The Presenter
347
Lectern Microphone
348
Riding the Level
349
Body Packs On or Off
350
Watch the Wireless Mic Status
351
The Difference between Rehearsal and the Event
352
Subtractive versus Additive Mixing
353
Mixing Techniques for Rhythm Section and Voice
354
Combining EQ
355
Learning from the Recording Engineers Bag of Tricks
356
Consciously Combining EQ
357
Basic Procedures for Building the Mix
358
Stock versus Custom Patches
359
Equalization and Effects
360
Acoustic Drums
361
Mids
362
Toms
363
Mixing Guitars
364
Dynamic Control
365
Electric Guitar
366
Mixing Keyboards
367
Mixing the Lead Vocal
368
Compression
369
Simple Delay
370
Compressing the Group
371
Reverberation
372
Focus Focus Focus
373
Blending Acoustic Guitars
374
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Bill Gibson, an instructor at Green River College in Auburn, WA

Bibliographic information