The Gender of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature

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Cambridge University Press, 1999 - Art - 297 pages
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In this illustrated historical survey of the image of death in art and literature Karl S. Guthke assesses the significance of the various personifications of death in different ages and cultures, as male or female, enemy or lover, friend or avenger, angel or devil. Guthke shows that such images are reflections of the life and cultures that produced them, and through them he offers astonishing new insights into the nature and perception of the Western self in its cultural, intellectual, and literary context.
  

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Contents

Why this book?
1
IMAGINING THE UNIMAGINABLE DEATH PERSONIFIED Is Death a woman?
7
THE MIDDLE AGES THE UNFORTUNATE FALL The wages of sin Adams sin or Eves?
36
RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE THE DEVIL INCARNATE Death and the Maiden and the man
80
THE ROMANTIC AGE HOW WONDERFUL IS DEATH The youth with the downturned torch The last best friend Death in the bridal chamber
118
Death immortalizing life
240
Notes
245
Select bibliography
273
Index
278
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