The works of Alexander Pope: esq. with notes and illustrations by himself and others. To which are added, a new life of the author, an estimate of his poetical character and writings, and occasional remarks, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Printed for J. Rivington, 1824 - English literature
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Contents

From Mr Wycherley Concerning the Mis
57
From Mr Wycherley His desire of his com
63
From Mr Wycherley On the corrections
69
TO 1707
75
the preference of nature to art in poetryf I
84
and horses to bring Mr Pope to Abberley
96
1 From Mr Pope Account how he passes
103
From the same On his translation of the
110
From the same Criticisms on Statius
117
From the same On the mixed condition
123
XHi From the same On Mr Cromwells severity
134
From Mr Pope On the same subject
144
From Mr Pope On sickness
150
10 f sion of the Ninth Book of Lucan j k
156
KXVI From Mr Pope Remarks on Crashaws
165
From Mr Pope Observations on the study
172
LETTERS TO AND FROM MR STEELE AND MR ADDISON
181
From the same On the Emperor Adrians
188
From Mr Pope Enclosing the above poem
194
From the same With advice on Popes trans
198
From the same Of the version of Homer
204
LETTERS TO AND FROM THE HON JAMES CRAGOS
213
From Mr Pope On Mrs W the Unfor
230
From the same Of the vanity of Fame
236
From Mr Caryll Concerning the Poem
249
rest
257
From the same to the Earl of Burlington
290
From the same to the same On the charac
296
From the same to the same After visiting
302
From Mr Pope to the Earl of Peterborough
309
From the same to the same Concerning
315
Letter Page
325
From the same to the Duchess of Bucking
336
LETTERS TO AND FROM EDWARD BLOUNT
345
From the same to the same On the Battle
351
From the same to the same On supporting
358
Letter Page
364
From the same to the same On Mr Blounts
372
From the same to the same Wishing him
381
From Mr Pope to Mrs Martha Blount
387
From the same to Martha and Teresa
472
From the same to the same With a
494
From the same to the same Begging
507
LETTERS TO AND FROM MR JERVAS SIR GODFREY KNELLER AND MR JONATHAN RICHARDSON Letter Page I To Mr Jervas Concerning t...
517
To the same on the same subject
520
To the same On moderation in friendship
521
To the same Concerning Mr Addison
523
To the same Concerning Mr Addison and Dr Swift
525
From Mr Jervas to Mr Pope
529
From the same
530
From the same With a message from Lady Mary W G
531
From the same Of the proposals for Mr Popes Homer
532
From the same On names and subscriptions received for Homer
533
From the same On Dean Berkeley
535
From the same to Mr Jervas in Ireland
536
To the same Concerning Mr Gay
538
To the same Advising him to commence historical painting
540
To the same On his long absence in Ireland
542
From Sir Godfrey Kneller to Mr Pope
546
From the same
547
From the same Inviting Mr Pope to come and see him paint
548
Mr Pope to Mr Richardson Upon paint ing on Sundays
549
To the same Containing an account of Mrs Popes death
551
ingbroke
552
To the same On the improbability of Mr Popes leaving Twickenham
553
MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS I To Mr Pope from his mother
557
From the same to his brother
558
From Mr Tonson to Mr Pope Proposing to print one of the Pastorals
559
From the same
560
From Mr Pope to Mr Lintot
561
From the same On account of subscription for Homer
562
Mr Steele to Mr Lintot Concerning Mr Dennis
563
Mr Fenton to Mr Lintot
564
Mr Fenton to Mr Pope On some extracts from Eustathius
565
Fragment of a letter from Mr Evans
566
From Mr Evans
567
Mr Pope to Mr Dennis
568
From Sir William Trumbull Of his first
569
To the same
571

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Popular passages

Page 123 - Happy the man, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire.
Page 194 - Hark ! they whisper ; angels say, Sister Spirit, come away. . What is this absorbs me quite ! Steals my senses, shuts my sight, Drowns my spirits, draws my breath ? Tell me, my soul! can this be death?
Page 373 - The tawny lion, pawing to get free His hinder parts, then springs, as broke from bonds, And rampant shakes his brinded mane; the ounce, The libbard, and the tiger, as the mole Rising, the crumbled earth above them threw In hillocks: the swift stag from under ground Bore up his branching head...
Page 195 - The world recedes; it disappears! Heaven opens on my eyes! my ears With sounds seraphic ring: Lend, lend your wings! I mount! I fly! O Grave! where is thy victory? O Death ! where is thy sting ? The Universal Prayer FATHER of all!
Page 379 - Nymph of the grot, these sacred springs I keep : And to the murmur of these waters sleep : Ah spare my slumbers, gently tread the cave, And drink in silence, or in silence lave.
Page 123 - Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years, slide soft away In health of body, peace of mind, Quiet by day. Sound sleep by night ; study and ease Together mix'd, sweet recreation, And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 94 - That changed through all, and yet in all the same, Great in the earth as in the ethereal frame, Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees : Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Page 95 - OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse...
Page 165 - All that regards design, form, fable, which is the soul of poetry ; all that concerns exactness, or consent of parts, which is the body, will probably be wanting. Only pretty conceptions, fine metaphors, glittering expressions, and something of a neat cast of verse, which are properly the dress, gems, or loose ornaments of poetry, may be found in these verses.
Page 291 - He said he heard I designed for Oxford, the seat of the Muses, and would, as my bookseller, by all means accompany me thither. " I asked him where he got his horse ? He answered he got it of his publisher ; ' for that rogue, my printer (said he), disappointed me.

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