The United States Democratic Review, Volume 6; Volume 37 (Google eBook)

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Lloyd & Campbell, 1856 - United States
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Vols. 1-3, 5-8 contain the political and literary portions; v. 4 the historical register department, of the numbers published from Oct. 1837 to Dec. 1840.
  

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Page 590 - Measures, is hereby declared inoperative and void : it being the true intent and meaning of this act, not to legislate slavery into any territory or state, nor to exclude it therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic institutions in their own way, subject only to the constitution of the United States...
Page 371 - The floating clouds their state shall lend To her; for her the willow bend: Nor shall she fail to see E'en in the motions of the storm Grace that shall mould the maiden's form By silent sympathy. 'The stars of midnight shall be dear To her; and she shall lean her ear In many a secret place Where rivulets dance their wayward round, And beauty born of murmuring sound Shall pass into her face.
Page 514 - Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 366 - Spake of heroic arts in graver mood Revived, with finer harmony pursued ; Of all that is most beauteous imaged there In happier beauty; more pellucid streams, An ampler ether, a diviner air, And fields invested with purpureal gleams ; Climes which the sun, who sheds the brightest day Earth knows, is all unworthy to survey. Yet there the Soul shall enter which hath earned That privilege by virtue.
Page 394 - Temple, he showed me the beginning of his Animated Nature; it was with a sigh, such as genius draws when hard necessity diverts it from its bent to drudge for bread, and talk of birds and beasts and creeping things, which Pidcock's showman would have done as well.
Page 514 - Convinced that the maxims which they now proclaim can^ not but be received with gratitude by the whole world, the undersigned Plenipotentiaries doubt not that the efforts of their Governments to obtain the general adoption thereof will be crowned with full Success. " The present declaration is not and shall not be binding except between those Powers who have acceded or shall accede to it.
Page 273 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been deemed proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintained, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European power.
Page 366 - Elysian beauty, melancholy grace, Brought from a pensive though a happy place. He spake of love, such love as spirits feel In worlds whose course is equable and pure ; No fears to beat away, no strife to heal, The past...
Page 514 - That it is consequently advantageous to establish a uniform doctrine on so important a point ; " That the Plenipotentiaries assembled in Congress at Paris can not better respond to the intentions by which their governments are animated, than by seeking to introduce into international relations fixed principles in this respect...
Page 370 - She shall be sportive as the fawn That wild with glee across the lawn Or up the mountain springs ; And hers shall be the breathing balm, And hers the silence and the calm Of mute, insensate things.

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