The Imperial History of China: Being a History of the Empire as Compiled by the Chinese Historians (Google eBook)

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American Presbyterian Mission Press, 1906 - China - 651 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
4
III
11
IV
18
V
28
VI
42
VII
57
VIII
77
XVIII
250
XIX
260
XX
286
XXI
306
XXII
324
XXIII
342
XXIV
361
XXV
377

IX
90
X
114
XI
134
XII
151
XIII
164
XIV
183
XV
202
XVI
220
XVII
228
XXVI
397
XXVII
415
XXVIII
437
XXIX
450
XXX
466
XXXI
491
XXXII
541
XXXIII
572
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Page 11 - He was reverential, intelligent, accomplished and thoughtful naturally and without effort. He was sincerely courteous and capable of all complaisance. The display of these qualities reached to the four extremities of the empire and extended from earth to heaven. He was able to make the able and virtuous distinguished, and thence proceeded to the love of the nine classes of his kindred, who all became harmonious. He also regulated and polished the people of his domain, who all became brightly intelligent....
Page 582 - ambitious of obtaining the position of middle-man between China and the foreign powers, because I thought I saw a way of solving the problem of placing pacific relations with China upon a sure footing. . . . My position was that of a foreigner engaged by the Chinese government to perform certain work for i Hue Book, China, No.
Page 413 - Let me tell you a strange thing too. When they are carrying the body of any Emperor to be buried with the others, the convoy that goes with the body doth put to the sword all whom they fall in with on the road, saying: "Go and wait upon your Lord in the other world!
Page 393 - The terms were very severe, but K'in Tsung was compelled to accept them, for a successful resistance was out of the question at present. They were five million ounces of gold, fifty million ounces of silver, ten thousand oxen, and the same number of horses, and one million pieces of silk. It was also stipulated that the Kin ruler should be allowed the title of Emperor; that T'ai-yuan, in Shan-si, and...
Page 572 - ... have been prepared to face. On the 28th of October they had baffled every obstacle and were encamped at Tsinghai, near Tientsin. "In six months this insurgent force had traversed four provinces, taken twenty-six cities, subsisted themselves on the enemy and defeated every body of imperialists sent against them."* Not daring to advance, they sent for reinforcements, but when these joined them there seemed to be no disposition to march on to the capital. Instead of that they occupied themselves...
Page 567 - They owned the plausibility of the argument, but expressed themselves persuaded that their imperial master would never listen to a word upon the subject. " To convince them that what...
Page 413 - Go and wait upon your Lord in the other world ! " For they do in sooth believe that all such as they slay in this manner do go to serve their Lord in the other world. They do the same too with horses ; for when the Emperor dies, they kill all his best horses, in order that he may have the use of them in the other world, as they believe.
Page 85 - ... they were to be put to death ; and that if they were heard expressing their belief that the ancient books and customs were superior to those of to-day they and their families were all to be executed. In the following year, finding that the scholars had not obeyed his order, Shih Hwang-ti ordered that four hundred and sixty of the most conspicuous of them should be decapitated as a warning to the rest.
Page 438 - At first the advantage was decidedly in favour of the Burmese, for the horses of the Tartars took fright at the appearance of the elephants and refused to advance in their direction. The general, upon this, ordered his men to dismount and tie their horses to the trees of the forest that stood near by. He then commanded that they should shoot their arrows against the elephants, in order to throw them into confusion, for he felt convinced that the chief danger to him and his men lay in them. This they...
Page 295 - that those rulers who have been remarkable for their attachment to either Taoism or Buddhism have been the cause of the destruction of their dynasties. As for me I believe in Confucianism. Just as wings are necessary for the birds and water for the fishes, and without which they would die, so I in like manner put my trust in the teachings of the sages of our country.

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