Among the Sioux of Dakota: Eighteen Months Experience as an Indian Agent (Google eBook)

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D. Van Nostrand, 1881 - Dakota Indians - 235 pages
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Page 34 - ... the United States now solemnly agrees that no persons, except those herein designated and authorized so to do, and except such officers, agents, and employes of the Government as may be authorized to enter upon Indian reservations in discharge of duties enjoined by law, shall ever be permitted to pass over, settle upon, or reside in the territory described in this article...
Page 235 - There is another class passing half their time at these agencies and half in the hostile camps. They abuse the agents, threaten their lives, kill their cattle at night, and do anything they can to oppose the civilizing movement, but eat all the provisions they can get, and thus far have taken no lives. If the agencies were removed east of the Missouri, we could suppress these violent and troublesome fellows.
Page 235 - Missouri we could suppress and punish these violent and troublesome fellows. The hostiles have representatives from every band, but the leading band in hostility is the Uncpapas. During the winter for the past two years almost the entire hostile Sioux have camped together in one big camp on Rosebud, near the Yellowstone. In the summer time they break up and spread over the prairie, either to hunt, plunder, or come into the posts to beg.
Page 235 - ... stay from twenty to a hundred miles out from Whetstone, coming into that place for their provisions. Their disposition is very suspicious, and, like their brethren, the Upper Brules, are not to be trusted. "The Oglalas at Whetstone are well behaved. "At the agencies established for the Sioux (Dakotas) there is one class of Indians which has been friendly for four or five years and are nearly permanent residents, only leaving from time to time to hunt and pick wild fruits. With this class there...
Page 47 - ... Indians by the Government. This practice, which the Bureau followed for some time in the Nebraska and Dakota agencies along the Missouri, was extended to the Sioux by the Treaty of 1868. The Sioux agencies in 1869 gave the same amount of rations to each person without regard to age. The amount given was as follows: One and one-half pounds of fresh beef, one-quarter of a pound of corn or meal, one-half of a pound of flour, four pounds of sugar to one hundred persons, two pounds of coffee to one...
Page 33 - the right to hunt on any lands north of the North Platte, and on the Republican Fork of the Smoky Hill River, so long as the buffalo may range thereon in such numbers as to justify the chase.
Page 47 - ... itself. In some instances the agent issued the rations to the chiefs who, in turn, made the subdivisions. At Whetstone both systems were practiced. With two bands, the chiefs received all the rations and subdivided them. With another band, the issue was made to the head of the family as follows: . . . Rations were issued every five days. Before the issue, each head of a family was required to procure a ticket at the agency office, upon which was stated the number of persons in his family and...
Page 185 - Italian beauty, _ who wore a dress beautifully ornamented with Roman pearls. This lady tore off the rich pearl fringe from her dress and gave some of it to each one of them, which pleased the Indians very much. . Captain Poole in his account gives us this paragraph : , "The contrast between the white women and the Indian women was extreme. The former lithe and graceful, delicately formed, with finely cut features, the peers and companions of man ; the latter _ heavy : and awkward, coarse featured...
Page 235 - The Oglalas at Whetstone are well behaved. "At the agencies established for the Sioux (Dakotas) there is one class of Indians which has been friendly for four or five years and are nearly permanent residents, only leaving from time to time to hunt and pick wild fruits. With this class there is no trouble. There is another class passing half of their time at these agencies and the other half at the hostile camps. They abuse the agents, threaten their lives, kill their cattle at night, and do anything...
Page 233 - Eyes," are perhaps the best behaved Indians on the river. The Oncpapas are turbulent and mischievous. Those who pretend to be friendly live at Grand River reservation, but give so much trouble that it is doubtful whether the agency can be kept...

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