Westward Ho! (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1920 - Fiction - 413 pages
3 Reviews
This historical romance of the Spanish Main was first published in 1855, and in 1920 with the dramatic illustrations of N.C. Wyeth, who is famous for illustrating Treasure Island, The Last of the Mohicans, and Robinson Crusoe. This vibrant novel captures the daring spirit of adventurers who sailed with Sir Francic Drake, and this new edition features text reset in the original typeface and full-color illustrations reproduced from the original canvases.
  

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Review: Westward Ho! or, the Voyages and Adventures of Sir Amyas Leigh, Knight, of Burrough

User Review  - Raagavan Rants - Goodreads

It has every possible human emotion that I can relate to every part of my life, and at the right proportion. Truly a magic portion! Read full review

Review: Westward Ho! or, the Voyages and Adventures of Sir Amyas Leigh, Knight, of Burrough

User Review  - Erin Winslow - Goodreads

When I first read this in the 6th grade (in 1976) I absolutely LOVED it! The story had action, adventure, chivalry, a hopeless cause. . .what more could I want. After rereading the book in 2011 I can ... Read full review

Contents

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Page 161 - The spirits of your fathers Shall start from every wave! For the deck it was their field of fame, And ocean was their grave...
Page 283 - All things have rest, and ripen toward the grave In silence; ripen, fall and cease: Give us long rest or death, dark death, or dreamful ease.
Page 272 - Death closes all: but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.
Page 207 - The Sun's rim dips; the stars rush out: At one stride comes the dark; With far-heard whisper, o'er the sea, Off shot the spectre-bark.
Page 394 - A' for the sake of their true loves, For them they'll see nae mair. O lang lang may the ladyes sit, Wi' their fans into their hand, Before they see Sir Patrick Spens Come sailing to the strand ! And lang lang may the maidens sit, Wi' their goud kaims in their hair, A' waiting for their ain dear loves, For them they'll see nae mair.
Page 377 - Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak She quells the floods below, As they roar on the shore, When the stormy winds do blow...
Page 407 - ... in and out above their heads: but Don Guzman he never heeded, but sat still, and drank his wine. Then he took a locket from his bosom; and I heard him speak, Will, and he said: 'Here's the picture of my fair and true lady; drink to her, Seftors all.
Page 144 - Besides, for solace of our people, and allurement of the savages, we were provided of music in good variety; not omitting the least toys, as morrisdancers, hobby-horse, and May-like conceits to delight the savage people, whom we intended to win by all fair means possible.
Page 165 - Cape Raz, their largest ship, the Delight, after she had " most part of the night " (I quote Hayes), " like the swan that singeth before her death, continued in sounding of trumpets, drums, and fifes, also winding of the cornets and hautboys, and, in the end of their jollity, left off with the battle and doleful knells...
Page 110 - He neither shall be clothed In purple nor in pall, But in the fair, white linen That usen babies all.

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About the author (1920)

Charles Kingsley, a clergyman of the Church of England, who late in his life held the chair of history at Cambridge University, wrote mostly didactic historical romances. He put the historical novel to new use, not to teach history, but to illustrate some religious truth. Westward Ho! (1855), his best-known work, is a tale of the Spanish main in the days of Queen Elizabeth I. Hypatia: New Foes with Old Faces (1853) is the story of a pagan girl-philosopher who was torn to pieces by a Christian mob. The story is strongly anti-Roman Catholic.. Hereward the Wake, or The Watchful Hereward the Wake, or The Watchful (1866) is a tale of a Saxon outlaw. The Water-Babies (1863), written for Kingsley's youngest child, "would be a tale for children were it not for the satire directed at the parents of the period," said Andrew Lang. Alton Locke (1850) and Yeast (1851) reflect Kingsley's leadership in "muscular Christianity" and his dramatization of social issues.

William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody (February 26, 1846 - January 10, 1917) was an American soldier, bison hunter and showman. He was born in the Iowa Territory (now the U.S. state of Iowa), in Le Claire but lived several years in Canada before his family moved to the Kansas Territory. Buffalo Bill received the Medal of Honor in 1872 for service to the US Army as a scout. One of the most colorful figures of the American Old West, Buffalo Bill became famous for the shows he organized with cowboy themes, which he toured in Great Britain and Europe as well as the United States.

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