Cross-pollinations: The Marriage of Science and Poetry

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Milkweed Editions, Jan 1, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 107 pages
8 Reviews
A pioneering ethnobotanist, Gary Paul Nabhan credits the arts with sparking unlikely scientific breakthroughs and believes that such "cross-pollination" engenders new forms of expression that are essential to discovery. In this highly readable book, he tells four stories to illustrate this idea. In the first, coping with color blindness in art class leads to his career as a scientist; in the second, ancient American Indian songs, when translated, reveal an understanding of plants and animals that rivals modern research; in the third, a poem inspires an approach to diabetes using desert plants; and in the fourth, a coalition of scientists and artists creates the Ironwood Forest National Monument in the Sonoran Desert.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

A discussion of the intersection of science and poetry, nowhere near as interesting as I would have expected, being myself both a scientist and a poet. I was very disappointed, especially since I had ... Read full review

Review: Cross-Pollinations: The Marriage of Science and Poetry

User Review  - Heid E. - Goodreads

A wonderful answer to any writer who must balance creative and critical work. Beautifully poetic, kind and hopeful. One of my favorite authors! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

CROSSPOLLINATIONS
3
Insights from the Cereusly ColorBlind
15
Decoding the Songs That Can Help Us Heal
27
Fitting New Metaphors to Nature When Old Cliches Fail
45
Staving Off the Extinction of Relationships Saving the Tree of Life
59
A PORTRAIT
75
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF GARY PAUL NABHANS WORK
95
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

He is a prize-winning author & naturalist, lives in Tucson, where he is director of conservation biology at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum & cofounder of Native Seeds/Search.

Bibliographic information