A Children's Treasury

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Wilder Publications, 2007 - Juvenile Fiction - 792 pages
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This omnibus edition contains eight of the most loved children's books of all time. Your child will treasure this magical book throughout their childhood. Included are The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Black Beauty, The Wind in the Willows, The Adventures of Pinocchio, The Story of Doctor Dolittle, The Song of Hiawatha, Heidi, and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This book will keep children captivated for hours on end and provided them with magical memories to last a life time.
  

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Contents

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
6
9781604590111
13
The Rescue of the Tin Woodman
20
The Journey to the Great Oz
27
The Queen ofthe Field Mice
34
The Wonderful City of Oz
41
The Search for the Wicked Witch
47
The Rescue
53
Dulce Domum
233
Mr Toad
242
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
250
Toads Adventures
256
WayfarersAll
264
The Further Adventures of Toad
273
Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears
282
The Return of Ulysses
292

The Discovery of Oz the Terrible
59
How the Balloon Was Launched
66
The Dainty China Country
73
Glinda The Good Witch Grants Dorothys Wish
80
BirtwickPark
92
Gingers Story Continued
100
Plain Speaking
107
James Howard
113
John Manlys Talk
120
Joe Green
126
The Golden Rule
170
A Friend in Need
183
TABLE OF CONTENTS
204
The Open Road
211
The Wild Wood
218
Mr Badger
225
TABLE OF CONTENTS
592
At Home with Grandfather
600
The Visit to Grandmother
613
Two Visits and What Came of Them
621
A New Chapter about New Things
627
There is Great Commotion in the Large House
640
Herr Sesemann Hears of Things that are New to Him
646
Heidi Gains in One Way and Loses in Another
656
A Summer Evening on the Mountain
665
Sunday Bells
674
Preparations for a Journey
681
A Compensation
690
The Winter Continues
701
How Life went on at Grandfathers
715
GoodBye Till We Meet Again
728
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About the author (2007)

Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored. Married in 1882 to Maud Gage, whose mother was an influential suffragette, the two had four sons. Baum often entertained his children with nursery rhymes and in 1897 published a compilation titled Mother Goose in Prose, which was illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. The project was followed by three other picture books of rhymes, illustrated by William Wallace Denslow. The success of the nursery rhymes persuaded Baum to craft a novel out of one of the stories, which he titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Some critics have suggested that Baum modeled the character of the Wizard on himself. Other books for children followed the original Oz book, and Baum continued to produce the popular Oz books until his death in 1919. The series was so popular that after Baum's death and by special arrangement, Oz books continued to be written for the series by other authors. Glinda of Oz, the last Oz book that Baum wrote, was published in 1920.

Born in Daresbury, England,in 1832, Charles Luthwidge Dodgson is better known by his pen mane of Lewis Carroll. He became a minister of the Church of England and a lecturer in mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford. He was the author, under his own name, of An Elementary Treatise on Determinants (1867), Symbolic Logic (1896), and other scholarly treatises which would hardly have given him a place in English literature. Charles Dodgson might have been completely forgotten but for the work of his alter ego, Lewis Carroll. Lewis Carroll, shy in the company of adults, loved children and knew and understood the world of the imagination in which the most sensitive of them lived. So he put the little girl Alice Liddell into a dream-story and found himself famous as the author of Alice in Wonderland (1865). Through the Looking Glass followed in 1871. In recent years Carroll has been taken quite seriously as a major literary artist for adults as well. His works have come under the scrutiny of critics who have explained his permanent attractiveness in terms of existential and symbolic drama: The Alice books dramatize psychological realities in symbolic terms, being commentary on the nature of the human predicament rather than escape from it. In addition to his writing, Carroll was also a pioneering photographer, and he took many pictures of young children, especially girls, with whom he seemed to empathize.

Kenneth Grahame was born in Edinburgh on March 3, 1859. When he was five years old, his mother died of scarlet fever and he nearly died himself, of the same disease. His father became an alcoholic and sent the children to Berkshire to live with relatives. They were later reunited with their father, but after a failed year, the children never heard from him again. Sometime later, one of his brothers died at the age of fifteen. He attended St. Edward's School as a child and intended to go on to Oxford University, but his relatives wanted him to go into banking. He worked in his uncle's office, in Westminster, for two years then went to work at the Bank of England as a clerk in 1879. He spent nearly thirty years there and became the Secretary of the Bank at the age of thirty-nine. He retired from the bank right before The Wind in the Willows was published in 1908. He wrote essays on topics that included smoking, walking and idleness. Many of the essays were published as the book Pagan Papers (1893) and the five orphan characters featured in the papers were developed into the books The Golden Age (1895) and Dream Days (1898). The Wind in the Willows (1908) was based on bedtime stories and letters to his son and it is where the characters Rat, Badger, Mole and Toad were created. In 1930, Milne's stage version was brought to another audience in Toad of Toad Hall. Grahame died on July 6, 1932.

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