London: Or, Interesting Memorials of Its Rise, Progress, & Present State (Google eBook)

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T. Boys, 1824 - London (England)
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Page 156 - And, seeing ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven, Unless you be possess'd with devilish spirits, You cannot but forbear to murder me.
Page 317 - Cutler saw tenants break, and houses fall, For very want; he could not build a wall.
Page 51 - When the great fen, or moor, which watereth the walls of the city on the north side, is frozen, many young men play upon the ice ; some, striding as wide as they may, do slide swiftly ; others make themselves seats of ice, as great as...
Page 157 - ... school: and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill. It will be proved to thy face that thou hast men about thee that usually talk of a noun and a verb, and such abominable words as no Christian ear can endure to hear.
Page 286 - The Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, Of the City of London...
Page 280 - ... displeasure would at all times affect their minds ; the declaration of that displeasure, has already filled them with inexpressible anxiety, and with the deepest affliction. Permit me, sire, to assure your majesty, that your majesty has not, in all your dominions, any subjects more faithful, more dutiful, or more affectionate to your majesty's person and family, or more ready to sacrifice their lives and fortunes in the maintenance of the true honour and dignity of your crown.
Page 157 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school; and, whereas before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used and, contrary to the King his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 279 - Most gracious sovereign, will your Majesty be pleased so far to condescend as to permit the mayor of your loyal city of London to declare in your royal presence, on behalf of his fellow-citizens, how much the bare apprehension of your Majesty's displeasure would at all times affect their minds. The declaration of that displeasure has already filled them with inexpressible anxiety, and with the deepest affliction. Permit me, sire, to assure your Majesty, that your Majesty...
Page 339 - Books and those things, which are or shall be printed or stamped contrary to the form of any statute, act, or proclamation, made, or to be made...
Page 337 - Whoe'er has travelled life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest welcome at an inn.

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