Cormac's glossary (Google eBook)

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O. T. Cutter, 1868 - Irish language - 204 pages
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Page 94 - ... it, and offers it to idol gods ; and his idol gods are brought to him, but he finds them not on the morrow. And he pronounces incantations on his two palms ; and his idol gods are also brought to him, in order that his...
Page 136 - J5J. his nose : like the blowing of bellows [?] smelting or.e the drawing and expiration of his breath : sledge-hammers would not strike off a glowing mass what his lips struck forth of fire : swifter, he, than a swallow or a hare on a plain : yellower than gold the points of his teeth : greener than holly their butt : two shins bare-slender, full-speckled under him : two heels spiky, yellow, black-spotted : his shin like a distaff: his thigh like an axe-handle (a) : his buttock like a half-cheese...
Page 130 - ... to him to be concerned in betraying Finn. Then Finn came (back), and Lomna cut an ogam in a four square rod, and this was on it: 'An alder stake in a pale of silver. Deadly night shade ... A husband of a lewd woman (is) a fool among the well-taught Fiann. There is a heath on bare Ualann of Luigne.' Finn then understood the story, and he became disgusted with the woman. The points of similarity to Chievrefoil in the Irish episodes from the Tain are: 1. A person knows that a troop is to pass along...
Page 114 - He used to know by studying the heavens [ie using the sky]), the period which would be the fine weather and the bad weather, and when each of these two times would change. Inde Scoti et Brittones eum deum vocaverunt maris, et inde filium maris esse dixerunt, ie mac lir,
Page 75 - Since the fe was measured on Flann. Aliter, a rod of aspen was used by the Gaels for the measuring of the bodies, and the graves in which they were interred, and this wand was always in the cemeteries of the heathen, and it was a horror to every one taking it in his hand, and every thing that was odious [?] with the men was struck with it, unde [in] proverbiuin venit fefris " a fe to it" ! for as the wand was odious cui nomen est fe, sic et alia res cui comparatur.
Page 129 - fair of a king's son', ie food and precious raiment, down and quilts, ale and flesh-meat, chessmen and chessboards, horses and chariots, greyhounds and playthings besides. Aliter, orce, a name for a salmon, unde dixit Lomna the Fool's head, after it had been cut off from him, ie
Page 95 - There was also a belief in the efficacy of charms, a belief which has not yet been forgotten. In the Brehon Laws mention is made of a fine for killing a dog by giving it a charmed morsel to test the charm, and see if it has virtue. In the same laws there is a fine for breaking bones from a churchyard...
Page 30 - Cruimther, ie the Gaelic of presbyter. In Welsh it is premier : prem ' worm ' in the Welsh is cruim in the Gaelic. Cruimther, then, is not a correct change of presbyter : but it is a correct change of premier. The Britons, then, who were in attendance on Patrick when preaching were they who made the change, and it is primter that they changed ; and accordingly the literati of the Britons explained it, ie as the worm is bare, sic decet presbyterum, who is bare of sin and quite naked of the world,...
Page 41 - a caldron' ie coi úire ' passage of the raw' : úr (is) everything raw ie raw flesh. Not in B. Siegfried compared coire with AS hver ' lebes' ' cacabue', Eng. ewer. — Ed. СОШЕ BIIECCA'IN ' Breccán's caldron' ie a great whirlpool which is between Ireland and Scotland to the north, in the meeting of the various seas, viz., the sea which encompasses Ireland at the north-west, and the sea which encompasses Scotland at the north-east, and the sea to the south between Ireland and Scotland. They...
Page 114 - Lir, a celebrated merchant who was in the Isle of Mann. He was the best pilot that was in the west of Europe. He used to know by studying the heavens...

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