Live to Tell: V.1 <br>1944-1951 <br><br>A True Story of Religious Persecution in Communist Albania

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iUniverse, Apr 2, 2008 - History - 1 pages
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Contents

The Year 1944
1
The Church in the Garden of Gethsemane
3
The Year 1945
9
Illegal Legalists
15
Violence Takes Power
21
Nights in the Archive
24
In Lekbibaj
30
The Albanian Union
40
Only Death
98
The Church Prison
104
Fratel Gjon Pantalia
108
Xhabir Dibra
118
Trial in the Hyllit tė Dritės Morning Star Editorial Staff Room
131
The Big Prison
150
Father Pal Dodaj
152
The Beden Camp April to November 28 1948
172

Remember
48
Anxiety After Death
52
More Scapegoats are Necessary
54
Hope and Disillusionment
55
The Postripė Movement
57
Arms in the Franciscan Monastery
60
Arrest in Melgushė
75
The Pillar in Pilates Garden
83
The SheWolf and Her Pups
90
Christ in the Big Prison
192
The Maliqi Swamp
196
Free
224
Home
234
In the Ruins of the Church
241
Notes
253
Bibliography
261
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

In 1944, Albania erupted in civil war. The communist party prevailed and acted quickly and brutally. By 1946, through executions, imprisonments, and mass banishments, the communists broke the back of Albania's freedom.

A young Franciscan Catholic and man of heroic character in this time of inhumanity, Friar Zef Pllumi was arrested, brutally tortured, imprisoned, and sent to labor camps. Through deeply personal descriptions of shocking atrocities, Fr. Pllumi focuses on his extraordinary will to survive and his powerful faith. His intense desire to "live to tell" honors those martyred with Christ's name on their lips. Fr. Pllumi was initially released in 1949.

Fr. Pllumi's memories are a brave confrontation of communism. His story's power lays in the fact that despite obscene efforts, the communist party could not succeed. As Fr. Pllumi states, "They think people are frightened before dying, but what they don't realize is that when you've arrived to a certain agonizing point, nothing is frightening anymore."

Fr. Pllumi's historical memoir also delivers clear lessons for today. Amid the many horrors, differences in beliefs melted away. Christians, Muslims, Albanians, Italians, and French alike, although wounded physically, emotionally, and spiritually, were still alive to help each other and stand together and triumph for mankind.

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