New Global Dangers: Changing Dimensions of International Security

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Michael Edward Brown
MIT Press, 2004 - Political Science - 552 pages
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Despite growing concerns after September 11, 2001, over the global terrorist threat and the spread of weapons of mass destruction, international security no longer hinges only on arms control and the prevention of war. Nonmilitary concerns, including emerging infectious diseases, environmental degradation, demographic trends, and humanitarian catastrophes, also represent significant threats to global stability. In this book, leading analysts offer an overview of critical security dangers facing the world today.The book looks first at the relationship between weapons and security, discussing such aspects of proliferation as "nuclear entrepreneurship" in Russia and the threat of biological warfare. It then examines nonmilitary security concerns, including resource scarcity, migration, HIV/AIDS in Africa, and why humanitarian assistance sometimes does more harm than good. Finally, it looks at the role of transnational actors, including terrorist groups, nongovernmental organizations, and the privatized military industry.

  

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Contents

Why Do States Build Nuclear Weapons? Scott D Sagan
45
TRANSNATIONAL ACTORS
48
448
128
242
141
477
158
280
180
Building a Comprehensive Dinshaw Mistry
215
SECURITY
301
302
342
HIV AIDS and the Changing Landscape of War in Stefan Elbe
371
The Rise of the Privatized P W Singer
512
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About the author (2004)

Michael E. Brown is Dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University.

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