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Books Books 1 - 10 of 39 on It will be seen that as in each event of to-day, so from the beginning, the decomposition....  
" It will be seen that as in each event of to-day, so from the beginning, the decomposition of every expended force into several forces has been perpetually producing a higher complication; that the increase of heterogeneity so brought about is still going... "
Illustrations of universal progress - Page 58
by Herbert Spencer - 1875 - 451 pages
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Outline of the Evolution-philosophy

Émile Honoré Cazelles, Edward Livingston Youmans - Evolution - 1875 - 167 pages
...advanced toward greater heterogeneity, and that its heterogeneousness is still increasing. It will be seen that, as in each event of to-day, so from the...decomposition of every expended force into several forces had been perpetually producing a higher complication ; that the increase of heterogeneity so brought...
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The ... Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, Volumes 1-5

Charles Alexander McMurry, Nelson Bollinger Henry - Education - 1900
...maintained by the ultra-evolutionary school of social philosophers. "Progress," Herbert Spencer asserts, "is not an accident, not a thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity." From the time of Von Baer it has been settled beyond question that organic progress is a change from...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 200

George Walter Prothero - 1904
...increasingly advanced towards greater heterogeneity.' And ' thus,' he concludes on the old note, ' progress is not an accident, not a thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity ' (Essays, i, 52). Scarcely had he finished this essay, however, before he seemed to discover a more...
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The Library of Original Sources, Volume 9

Oliver Joseph Thatcher - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1907
...a whole, and in every detail, it has unceasingly advanced towards greater heterogeneity. It will be seen that as in each event of to-day, so from the...progress is not an accident, not a thing within human consolution of the great questions with which philosophy in all ages has perplexed itself. Let none...
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The American Journal of Sociology, Volume 12

Albion Woodbury Small, Ellsworth Faris, Ernest Watson Burgess, Herbert Blumer, Everett Cherrington Hughes - Social sciences - 1907
...heterogeneous is that in which Progress essentially consists.10 It will be seen that as in each phenomenon of today, so from the beginning, the decomposition...not a thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity.*1 With this idea of increasing heterogeneity there were later incorporated the other elements...
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The philosophical radicals, and other essays: with chapters reprinted on the ...

Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison - Philosophy - 1907 - 336 pages
...has increasingly advanced towards greater heterogeneity." And " thus," he concludes on the old note, "progress is not an accident, not a thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity " ('Essays,' i. 52). Scarcely had he finished this essay, however, before he seemed to discover a more...
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Works: Essays

Herbert Spencer - Philosophy - 1910
...a whole, and in every detail, it has unceasingly advanced towards greater heterogeneity. It will be seen that as in each event of to-day, so from the...on ; and that thus progress is not an accident, not a_ thing within human controL-but a benchcent necessity. A few words must be added on the ontological...
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Science and Social Progress: A Philosophical Introduction to Moral Science

Herbert Wallace Schneider - Social ethics - 1920 - 65 pages
...laws, as the practical one of transferring human progress from human control to natural necessity. " Thus progress is not an accident, not a thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity."22 But in this discussion of mechanical structures we have already entered another type...
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Science and Social Progress: A Philosophical Introduction to Moral ..., Issue 12

Herbert Wallace Schneider - Social ethics - 1920 - 65 pages
...laws, as the practical one of transferring human progress from human control to natural necessity. " Thus progress is not an accident, not a /• thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity."22 But in this discussion of mechanical structures we have already entered another type...
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Christianity and Progress

Harry Emerson Fosdick - Christianity - 1922 - 247 pages
...in an automatic evolution which willy-nilly lifts humanity to higher levels. Said Herbert Spencer, " Progress is not an accident, not a thing within human control, but a beneficent necessity." " This advancement is due to the working of a universal law; ... in virtue of that law it must continue...
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