Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community

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Simon and Schuster, 2000 - History - 541 pages
241 Reviews
Drawing on vast new data that reveal Americans’ changing behavior, Putnam shows how we have become increasingly disconnected from one another and how social structures—whether they be PTA, church, or political parties—have disintegrated. Until the publication of this groundbreaking work, no one had so deftly diagnosed the harm that these broken bonds have wreaked on our physical and civic health, nor had anyone exalted their fundamental power in creating a society that is happy, healthy, and safe.

Like defining works from the past, such as The Lonely Crowd and The Affluent Society, and like the works of C. Wright Mills and Betty Friedan, Putnam’s Bowling Alone has identified a central crisis at the heart of our society and suggests what we can do.
  

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Excellent insights into American society today. - Goodreads
But the writing style induces anguish. - Goodreads
Well-researched examination of American community. - Goodreads
The writing is terrible. - Goodreads
Putnam is a competent writer and is very convincing. - Goodreads
But the writing was so tedious. - Goodreads

Review: Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community

User Review  - Anna - Goodreads

I should probably have read this book years ago, as it is a classic of social science and gets cited all over the place. I can see why now. Putnam treads a careful path between accessibility and ... Read full review

Review: Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community

User Review  - Crass the head - Goodreads

400+ pages read in less than a month! Illiteracy and impatient yet slow reading of my youth be damned, I'm doing alright! Read full review

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Contents

CONTENTS THINKING ABOUT SOCIAL CHANGE IN AMERICA
15
TRENDs IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND SOCIAL CAPITAL
29
Civic Participation
48
Religious Participation
65
Connections in the Workplace
80
Informal Social Connections
93
Altruism Volunteering and Philanthropy
116
Reciprocity Honesty and Trust
134
Education and Childrens Welfare
296
Safe and Productive Neighborhoods
307
Economic Prosperity
319
Health and Happiness
326
Democracy
336
CHAPTER 22 The Dark Side of Social Capital
350
WHAT Is TO BE DONE?
365
Lessons of History The Gilded Age and
367

Against the Tide? Small Groups Social Movements
148
WHY?
159
Introduction
183
Pressures of Time and Money
189
Mobility and Sprawl
204
Technology and Mass Media
216
From Generation to Generation
247
What Killed Civic Engagement? Summing Up
277
Introduction
287
Toward an Agenda for Social Capitalists
402
Measuring Social Change
415
Sources for Figures and Tables
425
The Rise and Fall of Civic and
437
NOTES
445
THE STORY BEHIND THIS BOOK
505
INDEX
515
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Robert D. Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard. He is currently president of the American Political Science Association, fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the author of nine previous books. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts. To learn more about Bowling Alone and ways to help rebuild our nation's social capital, visit the author's Web sites at www.bowlingalone.com and www.bettertogether.org

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