An elementary treatise on sound: being the second volume of a course of natural philosophy, designed for the use of high schools and colleges (Google eBook)

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J. Munroe and co., 1836 - Physics - 220 pages
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h, gl, très élémentaire, mais des noms et des instrumentgs à la marge

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Page 11 - ... feet. By a most unlucky coincidence, the precise focus of divergence at the former station was chosen for the place of the confessional. — Secrets never intended for the public ear thus became known, to the dismay of the...
Page 111 - ... them may be said to possess another sense, agreeing with our own solely in the -medium by which it is excited, and possibly wholly unaffected by those slower vibrations of which we are sensible.
Page xix - Anciens, où l'on expose le Principe des Proportions authentiques dites de Pythagore, et de divers systèmes de Musique chez les Grecs, les Chinois et les Egyptiens. Avec un Parallèle entre le Système des Egyptiens et celui des Modernes.
Page 11 - Sicily, the slightest whisper is borne with perfect distinctness from the great western door to the cornice behind the high altar, a distance of 250 feet. By a most unlucky coincidence, the precise focus of divergence at the former station was chosen for the place of the confessional. Secrets never intended for the public ear thus became known, to the dismay of the confessors and the scandal of the people, by the resort of the curious to the opposite point, (which seems to have been discovered accidentally,)...
Page 11 - Sussex repeats twenty-one syllables. Sir John Herschel mentions an echo in the Manfroni palace at Venice, where a person standing in the centre of a square room about twenty-five feet high with a concave roof, hears the stamp of his foot repeated a great many times, but as his position deviates from the centre, the echoes become feebler, and at a short distance entirely cease. The same phenomenon, he remarks, occurs in the large room of the library of the museum at Naples. M. Genefay has described...
Page xix - Considérations sur les divers systèmes de la musique ancienne et moderne, et sur le genre enharmonique des Grecs ; avec une dissertation préliminaire, relative à l'origine du chant, de la lyte, et de lajlûle attribuée à Pan. Paris, Goujon, 1810, 2 vol. in-8°.
Page 65 - ... variety in the modes of aerial vibration, and the astonishing acuteness and delicacy of the ear, thus capable of appreciating the minutest differences in the laws of molecular oscillation. All mere noises are occasioned by irregular impulses communicated to the ear, and if they be short, sudden, and repeated beyond a certain degree of quickness, the ear loses the intervals of silence and the sound appears continuous.
Page 8 - Foster, in the third polar expedition of Captain Parry, found that he could hold a conversation with a man across the harbour of Port Bowen, a distance of 6,696 feet, or about a mile and a quarter.
Page 8 - Dr Hearn heard guns fired at Stockholm in 1685 at the distance of 180 British miles; and the cannonade of a naval engagement between the Dutch and English in 1672 was heard across England as far as Shrewsbury, and even in Wales, a distance of above 200 miles.
Page 78 - ... fundamental one by fixed laws of harmony, and which are called therefore harmonic sounds. They are the very same, which, by the production of distinct nodes, may be insulated, as it were, and cleared from the confusing effect of the co-existent sounds. They are, however, much more distinct in bells and other sounding bodies than in strings, in which only delicate ears can detect them.

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