Felix Holt: The Radical

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, 1995 - Fiction - 544 pages
22 Reviews
When the young nobleman Harold Transome returns to England from the colonies with a self-made fortune, he scandalizes the town of Treby Magna with his decision to stand for Parliament as a Radical. But after the idealistic Felix Holt also returns to the town, the difference between Harold's opportunistic values and Holt's profound beliefs becomes apparent. Forthright, brusque and driven by a firm desire to educate the working-class, Felix is at first viewed with suspicion by many, including the elegant but vain Esther Lyon, the daughter of the local clergyman. As she discovers, however, his blunt words conceal both passion and deep integrity. Soon the romantic and over-refined Esther finds herself overwhelmed by a heart-wrenching decision: whether to choose the wealthy Transome as a husband, or the impoverished but honest Felix Holt.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
9
3 stars
9
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Felix Holt: The Radical

User Review  - Katymol - Goodreads

I was surprised how easy I found this to read since I remember Middlemarch being a slog. I love her characters. It's only not five stars because I can't quite see why Esther and Felix couldn't do more ... Read full review

Review: Felix Holt: The Radical

User Review  - Amanda Burrows - Goodreads

Not as fantastic as Middlemarch, but still a good read to get an idea of public opinion of the Reform Bill. Maybe not as political as the title suggests though. Read full review

About the author (1995)

George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans Cross) was born on November 22, 1819 at Arbury Farm, Warwickshire, England. She received an ordinary education and, upon leaving school at the age of sixteen, embarked on a program of independent study to further her intellectual growth. In 1841 she moved with her father to Coventry, where the influences of “skeptics and rationalists” swayed her from an intense religious devoutness to an eventual break with the church. The death of her father in 1849 left her with a small legacy and the freedom to pursue her literary inclinations. In 1851 she became the assistant editor of the Westminster Review, a position she held for three years. In 1854 came the fated meeting with George Henry Lewes, the gifted editor of The Leader, who was to become her adviser and companion for the next twenty-four years. Her first book, Scenes of a Clerical Life (1858), was followed by Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), and Middlemarch (1872). The death of Lewes, in 1878, left her stricken and lonely. On May 6, 1880, she married John Cross, a friend of long standing, and after a brief illness she died on December 22 of that year, in London.

Bibliographic information