The Vegetable Garden: Illustrations, Descriptions, and Culture of the Garden Vegetables of Cold and Temperate Climates (Google eBook)

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E.P. Dutton, 1920 - Vegetable gardening - 805 pages
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Page 120 - ... most marked differences from each other and from the original wild plant. In most of the Cabbages, it is chiefly the leaves that are developed by cultivation ; these for the most part become imbricated or overlap one another closely, so as to form a more or less compact head, the heart or interior of which is composed of the central undeveloped shoot and the younger leaves next it. The shape of the head is spherical, sometimes flattened, sometimes conical. All the varieties which form heads in...
Page xx - we conclude the article devoted to each plant with a few remarks on the uses to which it may be applied and on the parts of the plants which are to be so used. In many cases such remarks may be looked upon as idle words, and yet it would sometimes have been useful to have them when new plants were cultivated by us for the first -time. For instance, the giant edible burdock of Japan (Lappa edulis) was for a long time served...
Page iii - THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. Illustrations, Descriptions, and Culture of the Garden Vegetables of Cold and Temperate Climates. By MM. VILMORIN-ANDRIEUX.
Page 120 - But this plant has other transformations. " In other kinds, the leaves retain their ordinary dimensions, while the stem or principal root has been brought by cultivation to assume the shape of a large ball or turnip, as in the case of the plants known as Kohl-Rabi and Turnip-rooted Cabbage or Swedish Turnip.
Page 20 - Asparagus is forced for the markets, and in large quantities. The houses are heated by hot water, and the culture in other respects resembles that which is practised in forcing gardens in England — that is, when the plants are taken up to be forced indoors or in pits. The disturbance weakens the roots a good deal, and by this method the large table Asparagus is never forced.
Page 120 - In some kinds, the flower-stems have been so modified by culture as to become transformed into a thick, fleshy tender mass, the growth and enlargement of which are produced at the expense of the flowers which are absorbed and rendered abortive. Such are the Broccolis and Cauliflowers.
Page 119 - ... indigenous in Europe and Western Asia, is one of the vegetables which has been cultivated from the earliest time. The ancients were well acquainted with it, and certainly possessed several varieties of the head-forming kinds. The great antiquity of its culture may be inferred from the immense number of varieties which are now in existence, and from the very important modifications which have been produced in the characteristics in the original or parent plant. The wild Cabbage, such as it now...
Page 119 - Cabbage, a plant which is indigenous in Europe and Western Asia, is one of the vegetables which has been cultivated from the earliest time. The ancients were well acquainted with it, and certainly possessed several varieties of the head-forming kinds. The great antiquity of its culture may be inferred from the immense number of varieties which are now in existence, and from the very important modifications which have been produced in the characteristics in the original or parent plant. The wild Cabbage,...
Page 120 - ... heart or interior of which is composed of the central undeveloped shoot and the younger leaves next it. The shape of the head is spherical, sometimes flattened, sometimes conical. All the varieties which form heads in this way are known by the general name of Cabbages...
Page 105 - Thin out the seedlings, as soon as they are large enough to handle, to •9 in.

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