Witness for the Prosecution: A Play in Three Acts

Front Cover
Samuel French, Inc., 1982 - 112 pages
2 Reviews
Thriller / Characters: 8 male, 5 female

Scenery: 2 Interiors

Only Agatha Christie could have conceived such a suspenseful thriller and then capped it with an uncanny triple flip ending. A young married man spends many evenings with a rich old woman. When she is found murdered, the naive young man is the chief suspect. The testimony of his wife is expected to result in an acquittal, but she is a shrew who damages his case and all but hangs him before a vindictive mystery woman appears with letters against the wife. After the man is freed, it is revealed that mystery woman is actually the wife. She discredited and perjured herself because she felt that direct testimony on her husband's behalf would not have been sufficient to free him. When he turns his back on his wife and goes off with another woman, we realize that he was the murderer. He does not get away it, for there is one turn of plot remaining.

"A walloping success."-Herald Tribune

"Packs plenty of surprise in its cargo of suspense."-Daily Mirror

Winner of the New York Critics Circle Award

  

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Review: Witness for the Prosecution: A Play in Three Acts

User Review  - Kevin - Goodreads

A classic. Amazing twists of plot resulting in a breathtaking conclusion. Read full review

Review: Witness for the Prosecution: A Play in Three Acts

User Review  - Jamie Howerton - Goodreads

Lots of twists and turns for such a short book. Loved it! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
8
Section 2
40
Section 3
82
Section 4
107
Section 5
109
Section 6
111
Section 7
113
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

One of the most successful and beloved writer of mystery stories, Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie was born in 1890 in Torquay, County Devon, England. She wrote her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in 1920, launching a literary career that spanned decades. In her lifetime, she authored 79 crime novels and a short story collection, 19 plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language with another billion in 44 foreign languages. Some of her most famous titles include Murder on the Orient Express, Mystery of the Blue Train, And Then There Were None, 13 at Dinner and The Sittaford Mystery. Noted for clever and surprising twists of plot, many of Christie's mysteries feature two unconventional fictional detectives named Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple. Poirot, in particular, plays the hero of many of her works, including the classic, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), and Curtain (1975), one of her last works in which the famed detective dies. Over the years, her travels took her to the Middle East where she met noted English archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan. They married in 1930. Christie accompanied Mallowan on annual expeditions to Iraq and Syria, which served as material for Murder in Mesopotamia (1930), Death on the Nile (1937), and Appointment with Death (1938). Christie's credits also include the plays, The Mousetrap and Witness for the Prosecution (1953; film 1957). Christie received the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for 1954-1955 for Witness. She was also named Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1971. Christie died in 1976.

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