The Fear of Conspiracy: Images of Un-American Subversion from the Revolution to the Present

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Cornell University Press, 1971 - History - 369 pages
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First published by Cornell in 1971, The Fear of Conspiracy brings together eighty-five speeches, documents, and writings葉he authors of which range from George Washington to Stokely Carmichael葉hat illustrate the role played in American history by the fear of conspiracy and subversion. This book, documenting two centuries of conspiracy-mongering (1763-1966), highlights the American tendency to search for subversive enemies and to construct terrifying dangers from fragmentary and highly circumstantial evidence.

  

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User Review  - RandyStafford - LibraryThing

My reactions to reading this book in 1992. This book had a little bit to say of value about the so-called 菟aranoid style in American politics. Davis makes the valid point that images of the ... Read full review

Contents

Conspiracy in the American Revolution 17631783
23
Ideological Responses to the French Revolution 17951802
35
A Warning to Harvard Seniors against World
49
New Threats to Internal Security 18251860
66
the United States 1834
94
Popery Compared with Mormonism 1854
100
The Widening Conflict over Slavery 18351865
102
A Northern Party Is Seeking to Convert
144
A Study in Appearances and Realities 1948
258
1936
273
spiracy 1949
289
Communist America Must It Be? 1960
315
The Need for Black
324
The Truth about Vietnam 1967
336
Who Killed Kennedy? 1964
349
The Ku Klux Klan as a Subversive Conspiratorial
355

World 1892
192
Responses to International Involvement and Ethnic Pluralism
205
Foremost Problem 1920
228
Afterword
361
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History at Yale University and director of Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. His previous books include The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, which won a National Book Award and the Bancroft Prize, and The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture which won a Pulitzer Prize.

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