Select passages from the Georgics of Virgil, and the Pharsalia of Lucan, tr. [into verse] with notes and miscellaneous poems, by A.W. Wallis (Google eBook)

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Page 100 - Blear' d with the glowing mass, the ambitious sire, From anvils, sledges, bellows, tongs, and fire, From tempering swords, his own more safe employ, To study KHKTORIC, sent his hopeful boy. The spoils of War ; the trunk in triumph placed, With all the trophies of the battle graced, Crush'd helms, and batter'd shields ; and streamers borne From vanquish'd fleets, and beams from chariot« torn ; And ares of triumph, where the captive foe Bends, in mute anguish, o'er the pomp below.
Page 108 - Then to the palaces of heaven she sails, Incumbent on the wings of wafting gales ; The seat of gods ; the regions mild of peace, Full joy, and calm eternity of ease. There no rude winds presume to shake the skies, No rains 'descend, no snowy vapours rise ; But on immortal thrones the blest repose ; The firmament with living splendours glows.
Page 104 - Our heav'n, the just reward of human toils, Securely shall repay with rites divine; And incense shall ascend before his sacred shrine. Then dire debate and impious war shall cease, And the stern age...
Page 43 - Pour every lustre on th' exalted eye; A friend, a book, the stealing hours secure, And mark them down for wisdom. With swift wing. O'er land and sea imagination roams ; Or truth, divinely breaking on his mind, Elates his being, and unfolds his powers ; Or in his breast heroic virtue burns.
Page 104 - Argis. 285 nascetur pulchra Trojanus origine Caesar, imperium Oceano, famam qui terminet astris, — Julius, a magno demissum nomen lulo.
Page 43 - Oh, knew he but his happiness, of men The happiest he! who far from public rage, Deep in the vale, with a choice few retir'd, Drinks the pure pleasures of the Rural Life.
Page 33 - ... whilst a third traverses the air, and bids the forest re-echo to its harmonies, and greets the passenger with a song. Each part inanimate of the creation hymns and glorifies its Maker with a silent homage. For every thing which I behold, my God by me is magnified, and thus their hymn my hymn becomes, from whom I have derived my melody. Now universal nature smiles, and every sense is welcomed to the banquet. And now the magnanimous steed, disdaining the confinement of his stall, and spurning the...
Page 32 - The dolphin sports on the bosom " of the waters, dashing around the silvery foam, and follow" ing with alacrity the mariner. Now does the husbandman " prepare his implements of tillage, raising to heaven his eye, « and invoking Him who bade the fruitage flourish. How "jocund he leads his oxen to the yoke ! how patiently he "cuts the prolific furrow, while hope sits smiling on his " countenance ! The shepherd and the herdsman attune their " reeds, and meditate the rural strain, and celebrate the...
Page 31 - ... and in common with the season let us celebrate the festival. All nature now moves on in unison with our festivity, and rejoices in common with our joy. Behold the face of things. The queen of the seasons unfolds her pageantry to the queen of days, presenting from her native store whatever is most beauteous, whatever is most delightful. Now is the canopy of Heaven more cloudless; the sun rides higher in his course, arrayed in more gorgeous splendours; brighter is the circle of the moon, and purer...
Page 33 - Again the bird fabricates his nest, and one returns, and another enters the new-formed mansion ; whilst a third traverses the air, and bids the forest re-echo to its harmonies, and greets the passenger with a song. Each part inanimate of the creation hymns and glorifies its Maker with a silent homage. For every thing which I behold, my God by me is magnified, and thus their hymn my hymn becomes...

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