Nonviolent Social Movements: A Geographical Perspective

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Stephen Zunes, Lester Kurtz, Sarah Beth Asher
Wiley, Nov 5, 1999 - Political Science - 330 pages
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Nonviolent Social Movements is the first book to offer a truly global overview of the dramatic growth of popular nonviolent struggles in recent years. From the civil rights movement in the United States, and the 'People Power' movement in the Philippines, to the pro-democracy movements of Asia, Latin America, and Europe, nonviolent action has emerged as a key element of political change in recent decades.

Despite its widespread diffusion as a conscious movement around the world, we still understand little about nonviolence as a technique for social change. This volume seeks to provide an understanding of the extent to which organized nonviolent action can be used to replace violent struggle and the conditions under which it can succeed. Nonviolent Social Movements brings together case studies from around the world to demonstrate how nonviolent action works and what possibilities and limitations it holds for achieving social change and deterring aggressors.

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About the author (1999)

Stephen Zunes is an assistant professor of politics and chair of the Peace & Justice Studies Program at the University of San Francisco. His articles have appeared in Middle East Policy, Current History, Arab Studies Quarterly, Third World Quarterly, New Political Science,International Journal, and other scholarly publications. He is an editor of Peace Review and writes and researches extensively in the area of social movements and peace studies.

Lester R. Kurtz is a professor of sociology and Asian studies at the University of Texas, Austin. His research focuses on the analysis of social conflict, the sociology of culture and religion, and global social theory. His other books include Gods in the Global Village: The World's Religions in Sociological Perspective (1995) and The Web of Violence: From Interpersonal to Global (co-edited with Jennifer Turpin, 1997). He is editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace, and Conflict (1999).

Sarah Beth Asher is an independent researcher and has lived and worked in the Middle East, India, China, and Europe, where she served in the US Army Medical Corps. She has been involved in research on violence as a public health issue.

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