Miles Davis and American Culture

Front Cover
Missouri History Museum, 2001 - Music - 228 pages
7 Reviews

Miles Davis and American Culture examines Davis in cultural context. In this new collection of a dozen essays, William Kenney explores the St. Louis jazz scene of Davis's youth; Eugene B. Redmond looks at East St. Louis's cultural history; Ingrid Monson examines Davis and civil rights; and Waldo Martin discusses Davis and his relation to the black avant-garde of the 1960s.Original interviews and classic photographs round out the volume, published to coincide with the 2001 Miles Davis Festival, celebrating what would have been Davis's seventy-fifth birthday.

  

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Review: Miles Davis and American Culture

User Review  - Goodreads

Though it's occasionally marred by painfully academic examinations and endless repetitions of generally known facts, this set of new essays and interviews about jazz's so-called "Prince of Darkness ... Read full review

Review: Miles Davis and American Culture

User Review  - Phil Overeem - Goodreads

Though it's occasionally marred by painfully academic examinations and endless repetitions of generally known facts, this set of new essays and interviews about jazz's so-called "Prince of Darkness ... Read full review

Contents

Sensational Pulse
79
Miles Politics and Image
89
Miles Davis and the 1960s AvantGarde
107
Miles Davis and the Double Audience
149
A Conclusion
189
Chronology
209
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Gerald Early is Merle Kling Professor of Modern Letters at Washington University. He is also the editor of Ain't But a Place: An Anthology of African American Writings about St. Louis.

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