Appropriating Gender: Women's Activism and Politicized Religion in South Asia

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Psychology Press, 1998 - Political Science - 276 pages
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Appropriating Gender explores the paradoxical relationship of women to religious politics in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. Contrary to the hopes of feminists, many women have responded to religious nationalist appeals; contrary to the hopes of religious nationalists, they have also asserted their gender, class, caste, and religious identities; contrary to the hopes of nation states, they have often challenged state policies and practices. Through a comparative South Asia perspective, Appropriating Gender explores the varied meanings and expressions of gender identity through time, by location, and according to political context.

The first work to focus on women's agency and activism within the South Asian context, Appropriating Gender is an outstanding contribution to the field of gender studies.
  

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Contents

Two Reproducing the Legitimate Gommunity
15
Three Re presenting Islam
33
Four The Outsiders Within
53
Five Gender Politics Legal Reform
71
Six Woman Community and Nation
89
Seven Women and Men in a Contemporary Pietist Movement
107
Eight Gender Community and the Local State
123
Nine The Other Side of the Discourse
143
Ten Hindu Womens Activism in India
167
Eleven Motherhood as a Space of Protest
185
Twelve Women and Islamic Revivalism
203
Thirteen Agency Activism and Agendas
221
Bibliography
245
Contributors
269
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About the author (1998)

Patricia Jeffery is a sociologist with a distinguished record in the field of reproduction. Amrita Basu is a political scientist known for her research on fundamentalism in South Asia.

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