The Works of the Late Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1821 - English drama
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Page 59 - I'll tell you what, Jack — I mean, you dog — if you don't, by Capt. A. What, Sir, promise to link myself to some mass of ugliness ; to Sir A. Zounds ! sirrah ! the lady shall be as ugly as I choose : she shall have a hump on each shoulder ; she shall be as crooked as the crescent ; her one eye shall roll like the bull's in Cox's museum ; she shall have a skin like a mummy, and the beard of a Jew — She shall be all this, sirrah ! yet I'll make you ogle her all day, and sit up all night, to write...
Page 105 - Then he's so well bred ; — so full of alacrity, and adulation ! — and has so much to say for himself : — in such good language, too ! His physiognomy so grammatical ! Then his presence is so noble ! I protest, when I saw him, I thought of what Hamlet says in the play : — " Hesperian curls — the front of Job himself ! — An eye, like March, to threaten at command ! — A station, like Harry Mercury, new — '* Something about kissing — on a hill— however, the similitude struck me directly.
Page 146 - Then pray keep it fast, while you have it. Acres. Sir Lucius— I doubt it is going — yes— my valour is certainly going ! — it is sneaking off ! — I feel it oozing out as it were at the palms of my hands ! Sir Luc.
Page 94 - Now I think he has given you the greatest provocation in the world. Can a man commit a more heinous offence against another than to fall in love with the same woman? Oh, by my soul, it is the most unpardonable breach of friendship.
Page 358 - I would not care if he was hang'd, so I were but once married to him. No, that which pleases me is to think what work I'll make when I get to London ; for when I am a wife and a lady both, 'ecod, I'll flaunt it with the best of 'em.
Page 34 - ... tis safest, in matrimony, to begin with a little aversion. I am sure I hated your poor, dear uncle, before marriage, as if he'd been a black-a-moor ; and yet, miss, you are sensible what a wife I made ! and when it pleased heaven to release me from him, 'tis unknown what tears I shed ! But suppose we were going to give you another choice, will you promise us to give up this Beverley ? , Lydia. Could I belie my thoughts so far as to give that promise, my actions would certainly as far belie my...
Page 36 - Well, well, Mrs. Malaprop, I will dispute the point no further with you; though I must confess, that you are a truly moderate and polite arguer, for almost every third word you say is on my side of the question. - But, Mrs. Malaprop, to the more important point in debate, - you say, you have no objection to my proposal. Mrs.
Page 32 - But I say it is, miss; there is nothing on earth so easy as to forget, if a person chooses to set about it. I'm sure I have as much forgot .your poor dear uncle as if he had never existed — and I thought it my duty so to do; .and let me tell you, Lydia, these violent memories don't become a young woman.
Page 35 - Madam, a circulating library in a town is, as an evergreen tree of diabolical knowledge! It blossoms through the year! —And depend on it, Mrs. Malaprop, that they who are so fond of handling the leaves, will long for the fruit at last.
Page 211 - Cheeks of rose, untouch'd by art? I will own the colour true, When yielding blushes aid their hue. Is her hand so soft and pure? I must press it, to be sure ; Nor can I be certain then. Till it, grateful, press again. Must I, with attentive eye, Watch her heaving bosom sigh? I will do so, when I see That heaving bosom sigh for me.

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