The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of Dr. Johnson, G. Steevens, and Others, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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H. Durell, 1817
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Page 70 - Take, oh take those lips away, That so sweetly were forsworn; And those eyes, the break of day, Lights that do mislead the morn; But my kisses bring again, bring again, Seals of love, but seal'd in vain. seal'd in vain.
Page 6 - Heaven doth with us, as we with torches do ; Not light them for themselves : for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not.
Page 413 - When icicles hang by the wall, And Dick the shepherd blows his nail, And Tom bears logs into the hall. And milk comes frozen home in pail...
Page 33 - Too late? why, no; I, that do speak a word, May call it back again: Well believe this, No ceremony that to great ones 'longs, Not the king's crown, nor the deputed sword, The marshal's truncheon, nor the judge's robe, Become them with one half so good a grace, As mercy does.
Page 235 - Swifter than the moon's sphere; And I serve the Fairy Queen, To dew her orbs upon the green. The cowslips tall her pensioners be; In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favours, In those freckles live their savours. I must go seek some dewdrops here, And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
Page 151 - Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever ; One foot in sea, and one on shore; To one thing constant never...
Page 301 - That the graves, all gaping wide, Every one lets forth his sprite, In the church-way paths to glide : And we fairies, that do run By the triple Hecate's team, From the presence of the sun, Following darkness like a dream, Now are frolic ; not a mouse Shall disturb this hallow'd house : I am sent with broom before, To sweep the dust behind the door.
Page 168 - Why, then take no note of him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.
Page 50 - Do curse the gout, serpigo, and the rheum, For ending thee no sooner. Thou hast nor youth nor age; But, as it were, an after-dinner's sleep, Dreaming on both ; for all thy blessed youth Becomes as aged, and doth beg the alms Of palsied eld ; and when thou art old and rich, Thou hast neither heat, affection, limb, nor beauty, To make thy riches pleasant. What's yet in this That bears the name of life ? Yet in this life Lie hid more thousand deaths ; yet death we fear, That makes these odds all even.
Page 242 - That very time I saw, (but thou could'st not,) Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd : a certain aim he took At a fair vestal, throned by the west ; And loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts : But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the wat'ry moon ; And the imperial vot'ress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.

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