The Economics of World War I (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Stephen Broadberry, Mark Harrison
Cambridge University Press, Sep 29, 2005 - History - 364 pages
0 Reviews
This unique volume offers a definitive new history of European economies at war from 1914 to 1918. It studies how European economies mobilised for war, how existing economic institutions stood up under the strain, how economic development influenced outcomes and how wartime experience influenced post-war economic growth. Leading international experts provide the first systematic comparison of economies at war between 1914 and 1918 based on the best available data for Britain, Germany, France, Russia, the USA, Italy, Turkey, Austria-Hungary and the Netherlands. The editors' overview draws some stark lessons about the role of economic development, the importance of markets and the damage done by nationalism and protectionism. A companion volume to the acclaimed The Economics of World War II, this is a major contribution to our understanding of total war.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
an overview
3
Germanys economy at war 19141918 and beyond
41
3 AustriaHungarys economy in World War I
77
4 The Ottoman economy in World War I
112
the Dutch economy during World War I
137
6 Was the Great War a watershed? The economics of World War I in France
169
business as usual?
206
mobilising a backward economy for war 19141917
235
9 Italy at war 19151918
276
the US economy in World War I
310
Index
344
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Stephen Broadberry is Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick. His previous books include The Productivity Race: British Manufacturing in International Perspective (1997).

Mark Harrison writes about the history and economics of Russia, conflict, defence and security. He is a Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick. He is also a research fellow of the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham and of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University.

Bibliographic information