Age of Iron

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Random House, 1990 - Fiction - 198 pages
12 Reviews
In cape Town, South Africa, an old woman is dying of cancer. A classics professor, Mrs. Curren has all her life been opposed to the apartheid system. Now, she is forced to come to terms with the rage to her daughter, Mrs. Curren recounts the strange events of her dying days.

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Review: Age of Iron

User Review  - Caitlin Simmons - Goodreads

Coetzee...never fails to pierce my soul in ways that I could never anticipate. Quite possibly the best novel I have ever read by him. A countdown to a seemingly insignificant death...written in such beautiful prose that it can be physically heartbreaking at times. Just beautiful. Read full review

Review: Age of Iron

User Review  - Mark - Goodreads

The only reason I didn't give this five stars is because I was put off by Coetzee's pomposity. Regardless of whether he writes in first, second or third person his overweening self-importance is clear ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

J.M. Coetzee's full name is John Michael Coetzee. Born in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1940, Coetzee is a writer and critic who uses the political situation in his homeland as a backdrop for many of his novels. Coetzee published his first work of fiction, Dusklands, in 1974. Another book, Boyhood, loosely chronicles an unhappy time in Coetzee's childhood when his family moved from Cape Town to the more remote and unenlightened city of Worcester. Other Coetzee novels are In the Heart of the Country and Waiting for the Barbarians. Coetzee's critical works include White Writing and Giving Offense: Essays on Censorship. Coetzee is a two-time recipient of the Booker Prize and in 2003, he won the Nobel Literature Award.

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