The Harley-Davidson Reader

Front Cover
Motorbooks, Aug 15, 2006 - Transportation - 348 pages
2 Reviews
Harley-Davidson motorcycles are the grandest name in American motorcycling, and represent the freedom of the open road, a life of rebellion, and a heritage of craftsmanship for over 100 years. In this collection, the biggest and best writings, old and new, are assembled on Harley-Davidson and their unique mystique by writers and personalities that are part of the legend, from Hunter S. Thompson to Sonny Barger, Evel Knievel to Arlen Ness, and more. Punctuated with classic images-from vintage motorcycling photos to racing and walls of death posters to pictures from biker LPs and novels-these are the stories that have helped define the Harley-Davidson myth. The tales of the company's birth, the rise of the biker outlaw legend, and the modern-day revival of choppers, bobbers, and retro rides are all told by the best-loved sages of biker lore. With sidebars on biker movies, biker literature, and much more, this book chronicles the Motor Company's long ride into modern-day legend.

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Review: The Harley-Davidson Reader

User Review  - Cody - Goodreads

A great collection of stories about Harleys. If you like bikes, you'll like this book. Read full review

Review: The Harley-Davidson Reader

User Review  - Goodreads

A great collection of stories about Harleys. If you like bikes, you'll like this book. Read full review

About the author (2006)

Hunter S. Thompson was born on July 18, 1937 in Louisville, Kentucky. At the age of sixteen he was inducted into the Athenaeum Literary Association and wrote for the Athenaeum Journal. During his two years in the US Air Force, Thompson wrote a sports column for The Common Courier. After he was discharged, he moved to New York to work as a copy boy at Time Magazine and later moved to San Juan to write for a Puerto Rican bowling magazine. He also reported to the National Observer from South America. Upon his return to the US, Thompson wrote Hell's Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga, which became a national bestseller and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which was originally published in Rolling Stone magazine. Thompson wrote for Rolling Stone, Playboy, and Esquire. Both Bill Murray and Johnny Depp portrayed Hunter in feature film movies based on his books, Where the Buffalo Roam and The Rum Diary, respectively. Hunter S. Thompson committed suicide on February 20, 2005 at his home in Colorado.

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