Nevada, Colorado and Wyoming. 1890 (Google eBook)

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1890
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Page 159 - The legislature sat sixty days, and passed private toll-road franchises all the time. When they adjourned it was estimated that every citizen owned about three franchises, and it was believed that unless Congress gave the Territory another degree of longitude there would not be room enough to accommodate the toll-roads. The ends of them were hanging over the boundary line everywhere like a fringe.
Page 431 - Constitution, which was to be submitted to the people at an election to be held on the second Tuesday of October, 1864. The act also provided that in...
Page 431 - There was yet another reason why many rejected the constitution. The organic act of the territory, formed ere yet the civil war had burned its bill of rights so terribly into the conscience of the nation, provided that the right to vote at the first election should be extended to " every free white male citizen of the United States, including those recognized as citizens by the treaties of 1848 and 1853 with Mexico." The first legislature, in an act regulating elections, decreed that only citizens...
Page 738 - These men were bound together abreast, and a large canvas attached to them bearing this legend: "$900 stole; $500 returned; thieves, F. St Clair, W. Grier, ED Brownville. City authorities please not interfere until 10 o'clock AM Next case goes up a tree. Beware of vigilance committee." During the next six months a dozen men were hanged and shot by the vigilants, after which law became operative in Cheyenne, and the plague passed on westward to Laramie City and other towns which defended themselves...
Page 81 - The abandonment of Carson county " by the Mormons left it with a scant population, and for a time without a government, although attached by an act of the legislature to Great Salt Lake county for election, revenue, and judicial purposes. From July 5, 1856, to September 12, 1859, the operation of the probate court was suspended, although the county was allowed to retain its organization so far as a recorder, surveyor, and precinct officers were concerned, and these might be elected in accordance...
Page 418 - ... the shield, upon a golden ground, a miner's badge, being the same badge prescribed by the regular heraldic rules ; as a crest above the shield the eye of God, being golden rays proceeding from the lines of a triangle; below the crest, and above the shield, as a scroll, the Roman fasces, bearing on a band of red, white, and blue, the words Union and Constitution ; below the whole, the motto Nil Sine Numine; the whole to be surrounded by the words Sigillum Territorii Coloradensis, and the figures...
Page 466 - Interior Department will be ready to make presents too soon. It is better to chastise before giving anything but a little tobacco to talk over. No peace must be made without my directions.
Page 765 - In these mountain formations, which border the great plains on the west, are to be found beautiful flowing streams, and small rich valleys covered over with fine grass for hay, and susceptible of cultivation by means of irrigation. Fine timber for fuel and lumber, limestone and good stone for building purposes are here abundant. Gold has been found in places in valuable quantities, and without doubt the more common and useful minerals will be discovered when more minute examinations are made.
Page 201 - Bondholders' conspiracy to demonetize silver; legislation affecting national debt. and gold and silver; unfaithful treasury officials; hostility of national banks; independent financial policy for the United States; free coinage or enforcement of existing laws. ' Mr Stewart shows the absurdity of permitting foreign bondholders to regulate American finance, and ridicules President Cleveland's action in sending a commissioner, Manton Marble, to Europe to import the views of the purchasers of American...
Page 458 - Arkansas, and were then permanently occupying the country between the Canadian and Arkansas rivers, with 2,500 warriors; and that so soon as the troops were withdrawn from Fort Riley, a post erected in the region of the Arkansas river in 1852, they had assumed a threatening attitude, for which reason he considered it essential to have two permanent posts for troops, one at the mouth of Pawnee fork, and one at Big Timbers, both on the Arkansas, for the protection of travellers upon that route, that...

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