Pan (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
1 Review
One of Knut Hamsun's most famous works, "Pan" is the story of Lieutenant Thomas Glahn, an ex-military man who lives alone in the woods with his faithful dog Aesop. Glahn's life changes when he meets Edvarda, a merchant's daughter, whom he quickly falls in love with. She, however, is not entirely faithful to him, which affects him profoundly. "Pan" is a fascinating study in the psychological impact of unrequited love and helped to win the Nobel Prize in Literature for Hamsun.
  

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Review: Pan

User Review  - Sara - Goodreads

i would have given it 5 stars had the epilogue on Glahn's death not been a little anticlimactic. granted that given his neuroticism it made sense for his appetites to reach a disturbing pitch, but for ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
29
Section 4
61
Section 5
68
Section 6
83
Section 7
86
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Knut Pedersen Hamsun was born in Lom, Norway on August 4, 1860 and grew up in poverty on the Lofoten Islands. At the age of 17, Hamsun became an apprentice to a ropemaker and also began to dabble in writing. This eventually became his full-time career. The author of the books The Intellectual Life of Modern America, Hunger, and Pan, Hamsun is considered one of the most influential European novelists of the last 100 years. In 1920, Hamsun's novel, Growth of Soil, a book describing the attraction and honesty of working with the land, won the Nobel Prize for Literature. As a supporter of Hitler and the Nazi Occupation of Norway during World War II, Hamsun was charged with treason for his affiliation with the party after the war ended. His property was seized, he was placed under psychiatric observation, and his last years were spent in poverty. Hamsun died on February 19, 1952. A 15-volume compilation of his complete works was published posthumously in 1954.

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