The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, 1810 - English poetry
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Page 470 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began : From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.
Page 471 - To all the blest above : So when the last and dreadful hour This crumbling pageant shall devour, The trumpet shall be heard on high, The dead shall live, the living die, And Music shall untune the sky.
Page 523 - Refuse his age the needful hours of rest? Punish a body which he could not please ; Bankrupt of life, yet prodigal of ease ? And all to leave what with his toil he won, To that unfeather'd two-legg'd thing, a son ; Got, while his soul did huddled notions try ; And born a shapeless lump, like anarchy.
Page 480 - I am as free as Nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran...
Page 587 - Tis resolv'd; for nature pleads, that he Should only rule who most resembles me. Shadwell alone my perfect image bears, Mature in dulness from his tender years; Shadwell alone, of all my sons, is he Who stands confirm'd in full stupidity. ,The rest to some faint meaning make pretence, But Shadwell never deviates into sense. Some beams of wit on other souls may fall, Strike through, and make a lucid interval; But Shadwell's genuine night admits no ray, His rising fogs prevail upon the day.
Page 53 - Go, lovely Rose ! Tell her, that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young And shuns to have her graces spied, That hadst thou sprung In deserts, where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired: Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die ! that she The common fate of all things rare May read...
Page 587 - Through all the realms of nonsense absolute. This aged prince, now flourishing in peace. And blest with issue of a large increase...
Page 523 - With public zeal to cancel private crimes. How safe is treason, and how sacred ill, Where none can sin against the people's will, Where crowds can wink, and no offence be known, Since in another's guilt they find their own?
Page 564 - Chase from our minds the infernal foe, And peace, the fruit of love, bestow; And, lest our feet should step astray, Protect and guide us in the way. Make us eternal truths receive, And practise all that we believe; Give us Thyself, that we may see The Father, and the Son, by Thee. Immortal honour, endless fame, Attend the...
Page 23 - Contemplative piety, or the intercourse between God and the human soul, cannot be poetical. Man, admitted to implore the mercy of his Creator, and plead the merits of his Redeemer, is already in a higher state than poetry can confer.

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