T.i.m.e.d.r.i.v.e.: Time Spies Into Portraits Of The Past With The Knight On The River

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Xlibris Corporation, Dec 1, 2004 - Fiction - 394 pages
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PREFACE
This story centers on a group of kids, their families and the invention of an extremely technical device. Known as the TIMEDRIVE, this multi-computer-integrated system operates a very unique video camcorder that allows a controlled adjustment of the time variable. Incorporated for playback into a state-of-the-art, internally contained, spherically domed, three-dimensional theater, it actually replays coverage of the space-time continuum. The system is capable of viewing only the surroundings within range of the zoom lens. Consider watching a movie while sitting in the eye of the camera, as everything happens all around you in perfect portrayal of realistic life-size examples. The only catch is that at one time, this show was for real.

Consider the sun, boasting a core temperature of almost thirty million degrees, well over ninety million miles away. Our nearest star spans about three million miles in circumference, while containing a spherical volume of nearly a million and a half times that of the earth. Composed of many different gases at extremely explosive pressures, we cannot begin to conceive the power. Try to imagine over 100 billion one-megaton nuclear bombs exploding every second, still, while for who knows how many eons. This massive titanic fireball in space emits heat waves or gamma rays of incomprehensible supply while in the form of electromagnetic energy. They're always present or constant and carry light energy, which Einstein called quantum photons. The atmosphere focuses this heat energy upon the earth's surface much like a magnifying glass.

Our resulting weather factor, known as the quantum pinpoint, depends on the earth and how it's seasonally tilted (winter, spring, etc.). Summertime brings about an intense concentration of focal alignment between atmosphere and surface conditions. Most people prefer spring and fall, as the earth begins nearing or slipping away from pinpoint focus, providing very comfortable conditions. Factors such as altitude, longitude, latitude, distance from the equator, water supplies, soil types, and many other environmental qualities determine atmospheric reactions in our individual regional global locality. The mountains are at a higher altitude, never allowing them to fully focus, thus explaining the snow-covered tops. Plants and animals need the sun's heat or light energy in order to survive. If the human eye could focus on these heat waves in infrared, like a cat, we would be able to see at night. The sun's core energy is released in the form of gamma radiation, as unfathomable quantities of gaseous matter interact in the form of nuclear fusion. In this process, a pair of hydrogen nuclei, combined into a single helium nucleus, undergo countless other changes, and the result radiates throughout the entire solar system. The heat energy is absorbed, chemically transformed by living organisms, then reflected, and therefore bounced off the earth's surface.

The light photons reflect in your eye, as the dark pupil absorbs them. In only microseconds, a signal is sent to the brain, enabling sight. Think about wearing a black T-shirt on a hot summer day. How about the dashboard of your car when left sitting in the afternoon sun. The darker objects absorb the light or quantum photons while in a natural conductional transfer of chemical differences in potential energy. This is very much like unto the gravity of a mass in comparison to a spherical celestial body in motion. However, we won't get into that here. Where do you think the sunlight goes when it's reflected off the earth's surface? It's simply absorbed into space, as the cold darkness attracts the light or heat chemical energy. Einstein said energy could not be destroyed, only changed into another form. The universe is made of many strange abnormalities, which we don'

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