Freight Train Graffiti

Front Cover
Harry N. Abrams, Jun 1, 2006 - Art - 349 pages
5 Reviews
Like "Graffiti World," "Freight Train Graffiti" is the definitive history of a vibrant art form. Until now there was almost no written insight into this vast subculture, which inspires fascination across America and around the world. As dazzling as the art it celebrates, the book is packed with 1,000 full-color illustrations and features in-depth interviews with more than 125 train artists and "writers." Hundreds of never-before-seen photographs span the style's evolution, while the authoritative text from an all-star team of authors provides unprecedented perspective, including the first-ever written history of "monikers," the precursors of graffiti, developed by hobos and rail workers to communicate en route. Bound to surprise graffiti artists, graphic designers, and urban culture buffs alike, this book will inspire anyone who has ever been interested in graffiti.

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Review: Freight Train Graffiti

User Review  - Mcronald - Goodreads

One of the few published pieces on freight specific graffiti. A lot of people that contributed greatly to this community are missing but in Gastmans defense it would be nearly impossible to include everyone Read full review

Review: Freight Train Graffiti

User Review  - Erin - Goodreads

Beautiful photobook, great reference piece. Read full review

Contents

Preface
13
Foreword
21
Standard Gauge
28
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Roger Gastman has been involved with graffiti for fifteen years, and in 1993 he painted his first freight train. He has written extensively on the subject, and is the co-publisher of the pop culture magazine SWINDLE. He lives in Los Angeles.

Darin Rowland's childhood home was blocks from CSX's ACCA yard in Richmond, Virginia, where he fell in love with trains. Eventually, Rowland's addiction moved from trains to graffiti. He now lives in Philadelphia.

Ian Sattler has never been a full-fledged graffiti writer due to his horrible penmanship. Instead, Ian focused on other kinds of writing. His work has appeared in a number of books and national magazines. Sattler lives in Washington, D.C.

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