General Relativity from A to B

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, Mar 15, 1981 - Science - 225 pages
4 Reviews
From A to B may not seem a great distance to travel, but, as Robert Geroch demonstrates in his conversational style, our perception of distance is always relative to our position in space. For persons situated outside the speculative realms of physics and mathematics, Geroch's tour from A to B is a thorough introduction to Einstein's theory of general relativity. The early chapters are devoted to the development and modifications the crucial notion of space-time undergoes as it passes through the Aristotelian and Galilean viewpoints. From theories of absolute space and absolute time, Geroch than details modern ideas of a space-time in which neither space nor time is absolute, showing how our everyday conceptions are inappropriate to the physical world in which we live.
  

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Review: General Relativity from A to B

User Review  - Dipesh - Goodreads

General relativity - for when you get really serious Read full review

Review: General Relativity from A to B

User Review  - Ivan Vukovic - Goodreads

You can tell that the author of this little book is a brilliant mathematical physicist. The ideas are coherent, concisely presented, but without allowing unnecessary rigor to come in the way of ... Read full review

Contents

Events and SpaceTime The Basic Building Blocks
3
The Aristotelian View A Personalized Framework
11
The Galilean View A Democratic Framework
37
Difficulties with the Galilean View
53
The Interval The Fundamental Geometrical Object
67
The Physics and Geometry of the Interval
113
Einsteins Equation The Final Theory
159
An Example Black Holes
186
Conclusion
220
Index
223
Copyright

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References to this book

Time and Space
Barry Dainton
Limited preview - 2001
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About the author (1981)

Robert Geroch is professor in the departments of physics and mathematics, the Enrico Fermi Institute, and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Mathematical Physics.

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