Old Lace, a Handbook for Collectors: An Account of the Difference Styles of Lace, Their History, Characteristics & Manufacture (Google eBook)

Front Cover
B.T. Batsford, 1908 - Lace and lace making - 121 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
11
IV
17
V
22
VI
31
VII
35
VIII
37
XI
56
XII
52
XIII
79
XIV
81
XV
83
XVI
89
XVII
97
XVIII
103

IX
42
X
49
XIX
105

Popular passages

Page 40 - Netherlands, and about the end of the sixteenth or the beginning of the seventeenth century was brought thence to England by protestant refugees. Lewis Roberts, in ' The Treasure of Traffic,' published in 1641, makes the earliest mention extant of the manufacture in England.
Page 72 - French designs (fig. 24) which owes so much to the state patronage, contrasts with the absence of corresponding provision in England and was noticed early in the i8th century by Bishop Berkeley. " How," he asks, " could France and Flanders have drawn so much money from other countries for figured silk, lace and tapestry, if they had not had their academies of design?
Page 70 - Alcncon (or socalled Argentan) hexagon was about one-sixth of an inch, and each side of the hexagon was about one-tenth of an inch. An idea of the minuteness of the work can be formed from the fact that a side of a hexagon would be overcast with some nine or ten buttonhole stitches.
Page 89 - In the year 1543, it was enacted, " that no person shall put to sale any pinnes, but only such as shall be double-headed, and have the heads soldered fast to the shank of the pinnes, well smoothed, the shank well shaped, the points well and round filed, counted and sharpened.
Page 46 - The feel of the thread as it passes through the finger is the surest guide. The thread-spinner closely examines every inch drawn from her distaff; and when any inequality occurs, stops her wheel to repair the mischief. Every artificial help is given to the eye. A background of dark paper is placed to throw out the thread, and the room so arranged as to admit one single ray of light upon the work.
Page 51 - PJ 1'Vret. 1S24. l)eĞiimrq<icts. 1785. inches without detaching the lace from the pillow, the Dieppe point is not taken off, but...
Page 29 - AT THE BEGINNING OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. AT the beginning of the eighteenth century the Jews were fairly numerous in Moldavia.
Page 43 - A great part of their work is grounding lace. The manufactory of the lace is very curious ; one person works the flowers, and they are all sold separate, and you will see a very pretty sprig, which the worker gets but twelvepence for working. The merchants have all these people imployed, gives them the thread to make them, then they lay them according to a pattern, and give them out to be grounded ; after this they give them to a third hand, who hearts all the flowers with the open work...
Page 47 - In 1662 the English Parliament, alarmed at the sums of money expended on foreign point, and desirous of protecting the English bonelace manufacture, passed an Act prohibiting the importation of foreign lace. But the Court of Charles II., with its...
Page 87 - ... very many Thousands of Linnen Looms at work in England, and did supply the greatest part of our National occasion for Houshold and Coarse Linnens of all sorts. But all this Manufacture of Linnen in Cheshire, Lancashire, and elsewhere, is now in a manner expired; and the Huswifely Women of England now employ themselves in making an ill sort of Lace, which serves no National or Natural Necessity...

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